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I am trying to figure out how to eliminate a busy loop in a thread I have in Java. The thread does nothing but wait for a callback from the Listener class. The thread class looks something like this:

class MyThread implements Runnable, MessageListener{
  private Listen Listener;

  public MyThread(){
    Listener = new Listener(this);
  }

  public void run(){
    while(true){}
  }

  public void messageReceived(Message m){
    //do stuff
  }
}

I have tried to make this code as simple as possible. The idea is that Listener is waiting to receive some data from a serial port and when a message is received the thread will do some processing on it. I would prefer to use some synchronized variables such as a BlockingQueue of Message but I can't modify the Listener code. The issue, of course, is that the run loop eats up processor cycles. My questions:

If I wait or sleep in the run loop will the function call still work as expected? (I'm not sure how to test that this works 100% of the time).

Is there some better way to avoid this loop altogether?

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1  
It's difficult to understand what this actually does without seeing what is actually inside the while(true){} loop and the messageReceived method. –  Affe Jun 14 '12 at 5:30
1  
Something does not seem right here. Does the Listener create it's own thread? Because if it does, and it doesn't explicitly post-back (wait, how is it doing that?) to this one, but just calls a method ... and if it doesn't create it's own thread ... –  user166390 Jun 14 '12 at 5:30
    
@pst Indeed the listener does create its own thread. On some digging through the libraries related to it I found that it creates a thread and that there is a constructor so that I can create this thread from within my own. I can then do a join rather than the busy loop. –  Newlyn Erratt Jun 14 '12 at 6:02
    
Why does the thread exist when there is nothing to do? –  Peter Lawrey Jun 14 '12 at 7:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Do something like this

class MyThread implements Runnable, MessageListener{
          private Listen Listener;
          private Object lock = new Object();
      public MyThread(){
        Listener = new Listener(this);
      }

      public void run(){
        while(true){
            synchronized (lock) {
                try{
                    lock.wait();
                    // use the updated status
                }catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace()
                }
            }
        }
      }

      public void messageReceived(Message m){
          synchronized (lock) {
                try{
                    // Do something with the message here like update some status
                    lock.notify();                      
                }catch (Exception e) {
                    e.printStackTrace()
                }

      }
    }

Once you get the event, you update some status/ store the message and release the notifying Thread. Then from your thread process the event

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This helps a lot for what I'm trying to do. Between this and finding the the thread that Listener runs (not mentioned in the documentation) so that I can do a join before allowing this thread to finish its work and exit my problem is completely solved. I don't know why I didn't consider this previously. Thank you. –  Newlyn Erratt Jun 14 '12 at 6:18
    
It messageReceived gets called before the call to lock.wait(), then the wait will not end and the message will not be handled. There should be a while loop for messageNotAvailable around the call to lock.wait(). –  Michael Krussel Jun 14 '12 at 14:25

Going just by what you're posted, it looks like someone has misunderstood what a thread is and how it works. If there really is nothing inside the while(true){} and it's not that you just clipped it out for brevity, then handling the message doesn't actually happen on this thread.

Code does not run "on a thread" just because the method is defined on the implementation of runnable.

When your messageReceived(Message m) method is called, the body of that method executes in the calling thread. It does not get 'handed off' to this thread simply by virtue of being defined there.

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I really like that sentence, trying to make it stand out :) –  user166390 Jun 14 '12 at 5:33
    
Much code was in fact removed so that my example would be easier to see. The issue I was having was that eventually I want this thread to end but only once Listener is done (it turns out Listener has an internal thread that I am able to do a join on. There was one misunderstanding I have and that was whether a callback method such as this is executed in the current thread or calling thread. I had never fully considered this but what you say makes sense. –  Newlyn Erratt Jun 14 '12 at 6:08

If there is nothing to do your thread doesn't need to exist.

class AsyncMessageListener implements MessageListener{
    private final Listener listener;
    private final ExecutorService services = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

    public MyThread(){
        listener = new Listener(this);
    }

    public void messageReceived(final Message m){
        services.submit(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                // process message m
            }
        });
    }
}
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