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I want to inherit a class named CSprite from another class named CDocument before the CDocument actually declared, as some members of CDocument class are actually CSprite. I hope it don't seems confusing? Here is my code:

class CSprite: public CDocument {}

class CDocument
{
public:
    CDocument();
    ~CDocument();

    CSprite * AddSprite(string Name);
    CSprite * GetSprite(string Name);
};

I'm getting "base class undefined" error. I'm wondering may be this is not possible at all. Is it? The reason I'm doing this is increasing my code readability. Every document can have many sprites. Sprites are documents actually which can have other sprites inside them.

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How are documents different from sprites? Did you consider creating an interface for both documents and sprites and inheriting from this abstract base? Also, why not use a standard container such as vector for the contained sprites. –  dirkgently Jun 14 '12 at 5:48
    
Sprites are completely similar to Documents. Actually I use a vector container for storage. CDocument is just a wrapper for make things easier and increase code semantic and readability. Abstract class is a wonderful idea. I'm wondering why I didn't think about it at the first place?! Anyway, thank for you comment. –  Dane Jun 14 '12 at 6:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As CDocument.AddSprite/GetSprite both return a CSprite pointer, you may only need to declare the existence of CSprite in the document.

//declare CSprite
class CSprite;

class CDocument
{
public:
    CDocument();
    ~CDocument();

    CSprite * AddSprite(string Name);
    CSprite * GetSprite(string Name);
};

You can define CSprite Later in this file or in another, at which point you should be able to inherit CDocument. Although if run into more problems, you may want to redesign the object structure.

//CSprite Class
class CSprite : public CDocument
{
    ...
};
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Genuine! I'm mostly a Delphi developer and that's exactly how they do it in Delphi. I couldn't help but wonder how is this different than using templates? –  Dane Jun 14 '12 at 6:12
1  
Templates are used in more abstract situations when you want to write code that can function with many different variable types (ints double, MyObj, etc)... functions where the type of the variable isn't necessarily relevant to the operation, if this helps explain it at all. –  jfox Jun 14 '12 at 6:22

Inheritance from an incomplete type is not possible.
You can solve the problem in following different ways:

  1. Change the design where the dependency is where derived class depends on base class
  2. Have pointer or reference of derived class inside base class with derived class being forward declared
  3. Make the base class a template in similar fashion as CRTP
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Template the base:

class Document;

template<class Document=Document> class Sprite_t : public Document {  };
typedef Sprite_t<Document> Sprite;

class Document { /* etc. */};
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1  
+1 Nice hack. But it change the programming style and interface: by making Sprite_t a template, now all its inner functions (there aren't in this sample, but in general that's not the case) are now required to be inlined in the headers, and no more in separated translatable sources. Whether it is a problem or not, depends on the context. –  Emilio Garavaglia Jun 14 '12 at 6:18
    
Template member functions can be defined separately. Having the full definition available permits optimizations but it's not required. –  jthill Jun 14 '12 at 7:50
    
well ... it depends on what you mean by "separately": they can be defined outside the class declaration block, but not outside the translation unit. You cannot "compile" a template into an obj and make it a binary library. That was what I pointed out. –  Emilio Garavaglia Jun 14 '12 at 16:40
    
I think, if you check, you'll find that isn't true. –  jthill Jun 14 '12 at 18:12
    
you think?!? It is or isn't. What you or I think is irrelevant in a context like this. Provide sources. –  Emilio Garavaglia Jun 15 '12 at 15:40

No, that is not possible. The base class needs to be fully known, before defining derived class.

That looks like a broken design. You can fix by declaring CDocument first, and changing signatures :

class CDocument
{
public:
    CDocument();
    ~CDocument();

    CDocument * AddSprite(string Name);
    CDocument * GetSprite(string Name);
};

class CSprite: public CDocument {}
share|improve this answer
    
It don't seems a good solution. My aim is increasing the code readability. AddSprite returning CDocument will be confusing. I wanted to hide the fact that Documents are in fact Sprites. –  Dane Jun 14 '12 at 6:08

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