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I have an ASP.NET application where I use static class as cache. Inside that static class is internal dictionary, which holds cached objects. Of course, in static class are methods like Add/Remove/Clear... It looks as follows:

public static class CacheManager
{
    private static Dictionary<string, object> cacheItems = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    private static ReaderWriterLockSlim locker = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();

    public static Dictionary<string, object> CacheItems
    {
        get
        {
            return cacheItems;
        }
    }

    public static void AddCacheItem(string key, object data)
    {
        locker.EnterWriteLock();
        try
        {
            cacheItems.Add(key, data);
        }
        finally
        {
            locker.ExitWriteLock();
        }
    }

    ...
}

The items was added to the cache (dictionary) when ASP.NET application runs. I just want to ask should I check for example in Add method if key is already added in this way:

    public static void AddCacheItem(string key, object data)
    {
        locker.EnterWriteLock();
        try
        {
            if (!cacheItems.ContainsKey(key))
            {
                cacheItems.Add(key, data);
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            locker.ExitWriteLock();
        }
    }

Or leave it as is in first code snippet?

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
I'm more concerned with how code that reads from the CacheItems property is going to enter a read lock... –  cdhowie Jun 14 '12 at 5:52
    
You mean I also should put there some synchronization stuff? –  tesicg Jun 14 '12 at 5:54
1  
What about ConcurrentDictionary. Or are you not using .Net 4.0? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd287191.aspx –  McGarnagle Jun 14 '12 at 5:57
    
Does it matter to the caller whether the item was added or not? –  Rune FS Jun 14 '12 at 6:02
    
since you are exposing the dictionary all bets are off on the syncronization (even if all reads were syncronized) you could still add items without sync. A good example of where Law of Demeter would avoid the problems you might face –  Rune FS Jun 14 '12 at 6:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can implement one more method TryAdd

public static bool TryAddCacheItem(string key, object data)
{
    locker.EnterWriteLock();
    try
    {
        if (cacheItems.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            return false;
        }
        cacheItems.Add(key, data);
        return true;
    }
    finally
    {
        locker.ExitWriteLock();
    }
}

Also I would suggest to use ConcurrentDictionary. Here is the code of the ConcurrentDictionary.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand it, but which one should be used on client and why my second code snippet is not enough? –  tesicg Jun 14 '12 at 5:56
    
It all depends on what is the responsibility of the AddCacheItem method. In k0stya code it notifies the calling class if it failed. The question is if your logic needs to know, if adding a cache item failed. –  Eiver Jun 14 '12 at 6:00
    
Your suggestion about using ConcurrentDictionary is ok, but we use .NET Framework 3.5. –  tesicg Jun 14 '12 at 6:00
    
Eiver, I've understood what k0stya wrote. We actually don't need to know if AddCacheItem method failed. We only should make sure the duplicate key is not added. My second code snippet should be enough in that case? –  tesicg Jun 14 '12 at 6:04
    
Then the second is enough. Anyway take a look at code.google.com/p/codesmith/source/browse/trunk/Templates/… –  k0stya Jun 14 '12 at 6:06

Just execute twice:

cacheItems.Add(key, data);

...and you will know the answer. Basically the exception will be thrown and caught by the try/finally block. I would personally use the if statement rather than putting all the logic responsibility on the try block, but its a question of preference...

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. I did it and there's an exception if I don't use my second code snippet. That's why I'm asking this. –  tesicg Jun 14 '12 at 5:59
    
Well, typically I use exceptions for the unexpected stuff. If you use the try block, then in general you will not have any idea about what has happened. The dictionary.add() is easy, because it just throws ArgumentNullException or ArgumentException. Other methods may throw the same exception type for different reasons (or even just exception). I would say - use the if statement, because you enter the "else" statement then you know excactly what happened. I would use a try catch block in cases like socket.connect(), because it is impossible to do if(socket.CanConnect()) –  Eiver Jun 14 '12 at 6:11

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