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+------+
| num  |
+------+
|    1 |
|    2 |
|    3 |
| NULL |
|    5 |
|    6 |
+------+

This is table test.

select max(num) from test;   ---> 6

How to write a SQL statement that if NULL values exists --> output should be "OK"

if NULL values does not exist in this column --> output should be 6

I try many times but no luck. Any help? It would be nice if the solution is ANSI SQL

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1  
Based on your comment to an answer, I've added a mysql tag. It always helps to tell people which RDBMS you're using when asking SQL questions. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 14 '12 at 6:14
    
it's that possible to write for an ANSI SQL, i wanna try a generic one –  Kit Ho Jun 14 '12 at 6:15
    
It's fine to ask for standard answers, but they may not always be the best or even possible sometimes - and if you don't give the database, people will guess at one - if you're lucky, they'll tell you in their answers which one they've guessed at. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 14 '12 at 6:16
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7 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/dfcbd/2

This:

CREATE TABLE tbl
    (`num` int);

INSERT INTO tbl
    (`num`)
VALUES
    (1),
    (2),
    (3),
    (NULL),
    (5),
    (6);

select if(bit_or(num is null), 'OK', max(num)) as max from tbl;

Outputs:

OK

This:

CREATE TABLE tblx
    (`num` int);

INSERT INTO tblx
    (`num`)
VALUES
    (1),
    (2),
    (3),    
    (5),
    (6);

select if(bit_or(num is null), 'OK', max(num)) as max from tblx;

Outputs:

6
share|improve this answer
    
this was pretty cool and awesome ! –  Kit Ho Jun 14 '12 at 6:30
    
can you explain the use of bit_or to me i don't quite understand why it works. –  Kit Ho Jun 14 '12 at 6:31
    
you can read that bit_or as ANY, anything that has a match at least one, turns things to true. it's analogous to bool_or of Postgresql –  Michael Buen Jun 14 '12 at 6:34
    
On the opposite requirement, i.e. to find if everything is null, you can use bit_and (bool_and in Postgresql). There's an alias for bool_and in Postgresql, it's called EVERY. I think bool_or (and bit_or for that matter) was not named ANY as there's already an SQL construct that uses the ANY keyword –  Michael Buen Jun 14 '12 at 6:42
    
An example of bool_and anicehumble.com/2012/05/why-i-like-postgresql-it-has-first.html –  Michael Buen Jun 14 '12 at 6:59
show 4 more comments

ANSI SQL below http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!1/679b2/1

Most database don't have first-class boolean type, hence the query is longer. And many database, don't implicitly convert an integer to varchar

select

  case when count(case when num is null then 1 end) > 0 then 
     'OK' 
  else
     cast(max(num) as varchar(16))
  end

from tbl

If every database has first-class boolean, the above could be shortened to:

select

  case when sum(cast( (num is null) as int )) > 0 then 
    'OK' 
  else
    cast(max(num) as varchar(16))
  end

from tbl

Though if there's really a first-class boolean on every database, they would make bool_or/bit_or too, and it's shorter: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!1/679b2/6

select

  case when bool_or( num is null )  then 
    'OK' 
  else
    cast(max(num) as varchar(16))
  end

from tbl;
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Since COUNT(column) discounts null values, you could use:

SELECT CASE WHEN COUNT(*) = COUNT(num) THEN MAX(num) ELSE "OK" END
  FROM Test;

The DBMS I use (Informix) requires the types in the THEN and ELSE to be the same, so I ended up testing:

SELECT CASE WHEN COUNT(*) = COUNT(num) THEN CAST(MAX(num) AS CHAR(10)) ELSE "OK" END
  FROM Test;

It is one of the verbose ways of casting (but it is Standard SQL); there are often shorthands available in a given DBMS.

Example output:

+ CREATE TABLE Test(Num INTEGER);
+ INSERT INTO Test VALUES(1);
+ INSERT INTO Test VALUES(2);
+ INSERT INTO Test VALUES(3);
+ INSERT INTO Test VALUES(NULL);
+ INSERT INTO Test VALUES(5);
+ INSERT INTO Test VALUES(6);
+ SELECT CASE WHEN COUNT(*) = COUNT(num) THEN CAST(MAX(num) AS CHAR(10)) ELSE "OK" END
  FROM Test;
OK
+ DELETE FROM Test WHERE Num IS NULL;
+ SELECT CASE WHEN COUNT(*) = COUNT(num) THEN CAST(MAX(num) AS CHAR(10)) ELSE "OK" END
  FROM Test;
6
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This would work but using SQL Server, you need to cast the MAX(num) to a VARCHAR. I have no idea how MySQL behaves on that. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 14 '12 at 6:22
    
@Lieven: Agreed; Informix required the cast too. I was editing as you were commenting. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 14 '12 at 6:24
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Try this..

   select CASE num when num is null then "OK" else max(num) END from test; 
share|improve this answer
    
What happened to the end of the case? –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 14 '12 at 6:13
    
It returns 6 instead of "OK" –  Kit Ho Jun 14 '12 at 6:14
    
@JonathanLeffler, Thanks man!! –  manurajhada Jun 14 '12 at 6:15
    
@KitHo, please try again as i have edited and let me know if still doesnt works as i didnt executed the query. will check it myself. –  manurajhada Jun 14 '12 at 6:17
    
it's not ok, it return 6 –  Kit Ho Jun 14 '12 at 6:17
show 3 more comments

If you want to avoid running two queries (one to test for NULL values and then one to calculate max you can use count(*) and count(num) to count number of values with and without NULL values, like this (SQL Server syntax):

with TestQ as
(
   select max(num) as MaxNum, count(num) as NumCountNotNull, count(*) as NumCountTotal from nullAggTest
)
select 
   SpecialMax = case
      when NumCountNotNull < NumCountTotal then -1
      else MaxNum
   end
from TestQ

Note that I replaced your special value OK with -1 for simplicity, otherwise you need to cast a little which is besides the point :-)

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In my sql

Select (Case When hasNull > 0 Then 'OK' Else mx End) As Result
From
(
  Select Max(num) as mx,Sum(Case When numIs Null Then 1 Else 0 End) as hasNull 
  From test 
) as t
share|improve this answer
    
i try in mysql, it doesnt work –  Kit Ho Jun 14 '12 at 6:12
    
He wants 6 or 'OK' ? –  Sudhakar B Jun 14 '12 at 6:16
    
I want OK if there is NULL in that column, 6 if there is no NULL in that column –  Kit Ho Jun 14 '12 at 6:17
    
Check my new answer. –  Sudhakar B Jun 14 '12 at 6:25
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Try this

select 
    case when ( select COUNT(*) from tableName where num is null ) > 0 then 'OK'
    else CONVERT(varchar, MAX(num) ) end as [num]
from tableName
share|improve this answer
    
This always output's OK –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 14 '12 at 6:20
    
Yes it'll always output OK as long as your num column is having a NULL value else it will provide MAX from that num column –  yogi Jun 14 '12 at 6:22
    
That is not what I meant, this will always output OK, no matter what input's you have. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 14 '12 at 6:24
    
Sorry my bad, I have done some editing try it now. –  yogi Jun 14 '12 at 6:27
    
This always outputs 6 <g> –  Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 14 '12 at 6:34
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