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Is it legal to pass the return object of the function by value? I have a function from A::getA() that returns an object by value. Is it legal to reference this value in the same line, see the line b.processA(a.getA());

Please see my code below:

class A
{
public:
    int a;
    std::list<int*> m_list;

    A(int a)
    {
        this->a =a;
    }

    A(A& _a)
    {
        this->a =_a.a;
        m_list.push_back(&a);
    }

    A getA()
    {
        A localA(20);
        localA.m_list.push_back(&localA.a);
        return localA;
    }
};

class B
{
public:
    char b;

    B(char b)
    {
    }

    void processA(A& a)
    {
            a.a = 1;
            processA2(a);
    }

    void processA2(A& a)
    {
        a.a = 2;
    }
};

void main()
{
    B b('a');
    A a(11111);
    //************
    // IS THE FOLLOWING LINE LEGAL??
    // I mean, is it legal to pass the return object of the function by value
    //************
    b.processA(a.getA());
}
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1  
A link on why void main is bad: www2.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html#void-main –  chris Jun 14 '12 at 6:41
    
It is not legal to use void main(); you must use int main() or int main(int argc, char **argv). –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 14 '12 at 6:42
    
it's illegal according to which state's law? :-) –  Walter Jun 14 '12 at 8:59

2 Answers 2

b.processA(a.getA());

No. It will not even compile. The reason is thata.getA() returns a temporary object, which cannot be bound to non-const reference type.

However, if you make the parameter const reference as:

void processA(A const & a) 

then it is fine.

Note: MSVC++ provides temporary-object binding to non-const reference as extension. It is not Standard.

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I am running this code in visual studio 2010 as is, –  bochaltura Jun 14 '12 at 6:42
2  
Note however that the code has more problems (getA indirectly creates a pointer to a stale object) –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 14 '12 at 6:45
    
@bochaltura MSVS has an extension that lets you bind to a non-const reference. If you turn off language extensions, you'll get an error. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 14 '12 at 6:45
1  
@bochaltura: that is an MSVC 'extension' to the C++ language. –  Michael Burr Jun 14 '12 at 6:45
    
@bochaltura: Read the Note in my answer. –  Nawaz Jun 14 '12 at 6:46

So basically you are asking if:

X f();
void g(X& x);

g(f());

is legal or not?

As a safety precaution a noncost reference can't bind to a temporary. So the above is not legal.

However the following is legal:

X f();
void g(const X& x);

g(f());

The temprary will survive until g returns.

The reason the first version is llegal is because any changes made by g will be discarded, so why would you want that? It most likely indicates a logical error, so as a language design decision it was made a compile-time error.

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