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I am using a "Extended Validation" attribute to turn on stricter validation depending on how I am editing a record.

EG: I have a Parent which has children objects.

When Editing a Child, ModelState.isValid is false, due to the parent missing, e.g a first name, because I am selecting its parent by ID only.

When I edit a Parent -- I want these fields to be required, but not when editing e.g a child and the associated parent is part of what makes up the child.

I have the following code:

public class Parent
{
    [Required]        
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }


    [ExtendedValidationRequired(typeof(Parent))]
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
    ....}

And the following for validation:

public static class ExtendedValidation
{
    private static Dictionary<Type, bool> extendedValidationExemptions = new Dictionary<Type, bool>();


    /// <summary>
    /// Disable extended validation for a specific type
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    public static void DisableExtendedValidation(Type type)
    {
        extendedValidationExemptions[type] = true;
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// Clear any EV exemptions
    /// </summary>
    public static void Reset()
    {
        extendedValidationExemptions.Clear();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Check if a class should perform extended validation
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="type"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool IsExtendedValidationEnabled(Type type)
    {
        if (extendedValidationExemptions.ContainsKey(type))
        {
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
}






[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property | AttributeTargets.Field | AttributeTargets.Parameter, AllowMultiple = false)]

public class ExtendedValidationRequiredAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{


    private Type _type;
    // Summary:
    //     Initializes a new instance of the System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.RequiredAttribute
    //     class.
    public ExtendedValidationRequiredAttribute(Type type)
    {
        _type = type;
    }



    // Summary:
    //     Checks that the value of the required data field is not empty.
    //
    // Parameters:
    //   value:
    //     The data field value to validate.
    //
    // Returns:
    //     true if validation is successful; otherwise, false.
    //
    // Exceptions:
    //   System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.ValidationException:
    //     The data field value was null.
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        if (ExtendedValidation.IsExtendedValidationEnabled(_type))
        {
            return base.IsValid(value);
        }
        else
        {
            return true;
        }


    }




}

Is there any way I can get around passing the type explicitly into the validator? I want to be able to enable/disable these validation attributes programmatically.

For example if I am editing a Child, but a Parent's [Required] fields would cause me to have problems, I would disable typeof(Parent) in the extendedValidator, and then Validation should work OK. I am just worried about performance impact with all the typeof() going on.

My problem that this attempts to address is when I am editing a class such as

public class Child {

[Required] public virtual int id {get;set;}

[Required] public virtual Parent parent {get;set;}

.... }

My form just has the Parent ID (that is all that is needed in my EF or hibernate app), but it will not validate unless the Parent passed in the form has all of the required fields -- which is rather wasteful.

share|improve this question
    
Why are you passing a parent object to the controller action when editing a child? – Darin Dimitrov Jun 14 '12 at 7:06
    
Let me use a clearer example: I have a Car class which has a public virtual Manufacturer manufacturer. That manufacturer class has a required name , address, phone number, etc. Because my Car has a member called Manufacturer. When I call ModelState.IsValid -- because the mfr doesnt have a name, address, etc in my form submit, it fails. I only need the manufacturer ID to perform my Car edit, but the model won't conditionally validate those fields – Yablargo Jun 14 '12 at 7:07
    
That would be great. – Darin Dimitrov Jun 14 '12 at 7:08
    
I am passing a Child, and the Child class has a reference to Parent, in the original example. Thus validation fails unless Parent has all of Parent's required fields, even though they are not needed to select any particular parent for the child that is being edited. – Yablargo Jun 14 '12 at 7:12
1  
But why does your Child model has a Parent when you are editing only a child? Why are you passing your domain entities to your views? Why aren't you using view models? Like this: ChildViewModel in which you would include only what's necessary for the given view. All your problems come from the fact that you are not using view models: and believe me: validation is the smallest thing you will struggle with if you continue passing your domain entities to your views. – Darin Dimitrov Jun 14 '12 at 7:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could override ValidationAttribute.IsValid Method (Object, ValidationContext)

protected virtual ValidationResult IsValid(
    Object value,
    ValidationContext validationContext
)

And access members of ValidationContext Class

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Worked like a charm! That significantly reduces the number of models I need to create. – Yablargo Jun 14 '12 at 7:35
    
Although this helps you, I completely agree with @Darin Dimitrov and strongly suggest you to use view models instead of domain entities in presentation layer. Things get much simpler that way – archil Jun 14 '12 at 7:47

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