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I have read few articles about table partioning but still I am bit confused on its uses. My case is as follows.

I have a big Table TA containing 10 millions record approx and is daily loaded with 30-40K records.

Table TA contains many column including date field and one more critical column is project# which is varchar.

Now I have an option of partioning table TA on date field.

But if I see my query mainly I am going to fetch data for one date alone and since date field is indexed so data fetching is not a big prob.

Similary qry contains project# also in "WHERE" condion with "IN" clause i.e I have to give N number of project# as input through "IN" clause.

Now suggest me how should I proceed.

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does the "similary qry" also include the date? – Mario Jun 14 '12 at 9:13
yes.. Mario same qry contains both date and project#. – Avi Jun 14 '12 at 9:54
Is the date field the current date? – Jon Heller Jun 17 '12 at 4:40
yes date field is report upload date which is done daily ... – Avi Jun 18 '12 at 8:24
Did any of these articles mention that Partitioning is an option, that is, a chargeable extra to the Edition Enterprise license? – APC Mar 10 '13 at 4:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you will always read the full daily data, do this:

Step 0) Drop the global index on date, you won't need it with partitions.

Step 1) Create daily partitions

Step 2) Create a secondary partition local index on project

If I misundertood you, and you won't read the full daily partition, just parts of it, then leave your schema as it is.

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create index ta_idx on ta(upload_date, project#) compress 1;

A multi-column, compressed index may be good enough. Since the upload_date will not change much as rows are added, the clustering factor will remain very low. And if there are many repeated values, compressing upload_date can save a lot of space. This will probably be a very efficient index.

You certainly could make things more efficient by adding partitioning, but it may not be worth the trouble. Partitioning is very useful, but it can also be very tricky. If this is the only place you plan to use partitioning, I would avoid it. (Unless you want to use this as an excuse to learn more about partitioning.)

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