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Print all combinations of a number N, as a sum of positive integers?
They should be unique

Example

3 =
1 2

1 1 1

.

4=
3 1

2 2

1 1 2

1 1 1 1

I have made a solution for this using backtracking but the problem is that it is also giving duplicates for example for 3

I am getting

1 1 2

2 1 1

How to get unique combinations only?

Many many thanks in advance

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1  
without code it is difficult to tell –  phoxis Jun 14 '12 at 7:30
    
Sort your lists, compare them and throw away duplicates? Not the fastest way, but should work –  Juan Mendes Jun 14 '12 at 7:33
    
I know it will work but it is not efficient i think –  Luv Jun 14 '12 at 7:34
1  
can you share your code? –  mtariq Jun 14 '12 at 7:37
2  

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you create your back you will always start from the last number(for the first time you consider 1 as the last number)( basically you keep a sorted solution) this is how you always keep a unique solution.

#include <iostream>

const int N = 4;

int sol[N];
int sum = 0;
int nr_of_elements;

void back(int lastElement)
{
    if (sum == N)
    {
        for (int i = 0 ; i < nr_of_elements; i++)
            std :: cout << sol[i] << " ";
        std :: cout << "\n";
        return ;
    }
    for ( int i = lastElement ; i <= N - sum ; i++)
    {
        sum += i;
        sol[nr_of_elements++] = i;
        back(i);
        sum -= i;
        nr_of_elements--;
    }
}

int main ()
{
    back(1);
    return 0;
}
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Can u please elaborate more? –  Luv Jun 14 '12 at 7:39

Pass the last number used as a parameter.

void rec(int lastUsed)
{
    for (int i = lastUsed; i <= max; i++)
       rec(i);
}
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And what this last number will do? –  Luv Jun 14 '12 at 7:36

For each number, you only need to check the numbers that are greater than or equal to it. For example:

1 1 1 1
1 1 2
1 2 1 (not this, as the third 1 is less than is precedent 2)
1 3
2 1 1 (not this)
2 2
3 1 (not this)
4
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Here's a Java version of Ionescu Roberts answer:

static Set<List<Integer>> getNums(int last, int target) {

    Set<List<Integer>> toReturn = new HashSet<List<Integer>>();

    if (target == 0) {
        toReturn.add(new ArrayList<Integer>());
        return toReturn;
    }

    for (int i = last; i <= target; i++) {
        for (List<Integer> subSolution : getNums(i, target - i)) {
            List<Integer> seq = new ArrayList<Integer>(subSolution);
            seq.add(i);
            toReturn.add(seq);
        }
    }

    return toReturn;
}
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Not really. You have to pass the last number used and use only <= than it. –  Petar Minchev Jun 14 '12 at 7:31
    
When i will select one then in next recursion again i would start from one because sum is three Hence One possible solution is 1 1 1 And then i will get 1 2 But next time when i will start from 2 then i will get 1 hence 2 1 Hence not unique –  Luv Jun 14 '12 at 7:32
    
Repetition is allowed –  Luv Jun 14 '12 at 7:33
    
@Luv, Ionescu Robert got it. Updating my answer. –  aioobe Jun 14 '12 at 7:43

A cleaner implementation of the backtracking solving the given problem (Refer Algorithm Design Manual: Same template used here).

    #define V(x)  vector<x >    
    typedef V(int) VI; 

    bool  isSolutionReached(VI & input, VI  & partial, int k,int data)  {
     if (k==data) return true;
         return false; 
    }
    void  processSolution(VI & input,VI & partial, int k,int data)   {
      int sum=0,i=0;    
      for(i=0;i<=data;i++)  
    if(partial[i]!=0 ) {
        sum+=i; 
    }
          if(sum == k)  {
    for(i=0;i<=data;i++) 
                      if(partial[i]!=0) cout <<i<<"\t";
     cout <<"\n"; 
       }
    }

    void  constructNext(VI  & input,VI  & candidateVector,int k,int data) {
        candidateVector.push_back(0);
        candidateVector.push_back(1); 
    }
  bool finished=false; 

    void backTrack(VI & inp, VI  &partial,  int k,int data )  {
   VI  candidateVector; 
   int i=0;
    if( isSolutionReached(partial,inp,k,data))  {
    processSolution(inp,partial,k,data);  
}else {
    k=k+1; 
      constructNext(inp,candidateVector,k,data);  
      for(i=0;i<candidateVector.size();i++)  {
          partial[k]=candidateVector[i];  
          backTrack(inp,partial,k,data); 
      }
}
    }


    int main() { 
  int n=5;  //This is x+1 
  VI inp(5,0);  
  VI partial(5,0); 
  backTrack(inp,partial,0,n-1); 
  return 0; 
   }
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This answer applies to Java and C# and the like where you can override equals and hashcode.

The easiest way is to leverage an existing algorithm that generates 2^N possible combinations, but tweak it to use Set to eliminate duplicates. Your method will return a Set of all combinations and contain no duplicates. Now you need to tell Set how to recognise 2 duplicate combinations: use a list, and override equals and hashcode methods.

You want to store the combination in a list, let's call UniqueList, that wraps around java.util.ArrayList:

class UniqueList {
    ArrayList data = new ArrayList();
    void add(Integer item) {
        data.add(item);
    }

    //more wrapper calls if you want

    @Override
    public boolean equals(UniqueList anotherList) {
        if (data.size() != anotherList.data.size()) return false
        //only need to sort once in each list
        Collections.sort(data); 
        Collections.sort(anotherList.data);
        for (int i = 0; i < data.size(); i++) {
            if (data.get(i) != anotherList.data.get(i)) return false
        }

        return true;
    }

    //optionally override hashcode for performance on hashtable
}

Now in the existing generating algorithm, use

Set<UniqueList<Integer>>

to hold the set of combinations, it will guarantee no duplicates, as Set will use equals() method to check before it admits a combination.

You can add a boolean flag to indicate whether the list is already sorted to avoid sorting repeatly - in other words each list only needs to be sorted once, for the purpose of checking duplication.

This approach clearly is not optimal, but you can plug it in an existing algorithm to achieve 0 duplication with minimal code change.

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