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I have the prime factorization as a dictionary:

>>>pf(100)
>>>{2:2,5:2}

What is the best pythonic way for retrieving all the divisors of the number using the function pf? feel free to use itertools.

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closed as not a real question by Romil, casperOne Jun 14 '12 at 15:56

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1  
Shouldn't that be {2:1,5:1}? –  Nick Craig-Wood Jun 14 '12 at 8:06
    
Yes I was confused by your dictionary as well. –  user1413793 Jun 14 '12 at 8:24
    
I think the dict format is factor as key, and exponent as value - 2**2 * 5**2. –  Paul McGuire Jun 14 '12 at 9:55
    
haha.. I previously wrote pf(10) in the question. –  prongs Jun 15 '12 at 6:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Something like this maybe

>>> from itertools import *
>>> from operator import mul
>>> d = {2:2,5:1} # result of pf(20)
>>> l = list(chain(*([k] * v for k, v in d.iteritems())))
>>> l
[2, 2, 5]
>>> factors = set(chain(*(permutations(l, i) for i in range(1,len(l)+1))))
set([(2, 2, 5), (2,), (5,), (5, 2, 2), (2, 2), (2, 5), (5, 2), (2, 5, 2)])
>>> set(reduce(mul, fs, 1) for fs in factors)
set([4, 2, 10, 20, 5])
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Can't get more pythonic than that. –  Burhan Khalid Jun 14 '12 at 8:11
    
+1, but consider combinations instead of permutations. –  georg Jun 14 '12 at 8:39
from itertools import product
def primeplus():
  """
  Superset of primes using the primes are a subset of 6k+1 and 6k-1.
  """
  yield 2
  yield 3
  n=5
  while(True):
    yield n
    yield n+2
    n+=6
def primefactorization(n):
  ret={}
  for i in primeplus():
    if n==1: break
    while n%i==0:
      ret[i]=ret.setdefault(i,0)+1
      n=n//i
  return ret
def divisors(n):
  pf=primefactorization(n)
  keys,values=zip(*pf.items())
  return (reduce(lambda x,y:(x[0]**x[1])*(y[0]**y[1]),zip(keys,p1)+[(1,1)]) for p1 in product(*(xrange(v+1) for v in values)))
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Although this answer is not overly pythonic it uses simple recursion to find the prime factors.

def find_factors(x):
    for i in xrange(2, int(x ** 0.5) + 1):
        if x % i == 0:
            return [i] + find_factors(x / i)
    return [x]

print find_factors(13) # [13]
print find_factors(103) # [103]
print find_factors(125) # [5,5,5]
print find_factors(1334234) # [2, 11, 60647]

from collections import Counter

print dict(Counter(find_factors(13))) # {13: 1}
print dict(Counter(find_factors(103))) # {103: 1}
print dict(Counter(find_factors(125))) # {5: 3}
print dict(Counter(find_factors(1334234))) # {2: 1, 11: 1, 60647: 1}
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You only have to search until x ** 0.5 (i.e the upper bound of your xrange can be x**0.5 + 1 instead of x / 2; it gives you a better big O runtime). Also, x/2 already returns an int (integer division by default floors the result). –  user1413793 Jun 14 '12 at 8:23
    
Fixed it, thanks for the heads up on that :-) –  Jesse Harris Jun 14 '12 at 8:26
    
It should be x ** 0.5 + 1 because xrange does not include the upper bound. For example, in the case of 9 you would want xrange to stop at 3. The way you have it right now it will stop at 2 and claim 9 is a prime number. –  user1413793 Jun 14 '12 at 8:30
    
Fixed again, devil is the details :) –  Jesse Harris Jun 14 '12 at 8:50

A one-liner:

>>> d = {3:4, 5:1, 2:2}
>>> sorted(map(lambda p: reduce(mul, p), product(*map(lambda c: [c[0] ** i for i in range(c[1] + 1)], d.iteritems()))))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, 27, 30, 36, 45, 54, 60, 81, 90, 108, 135, 162, 180, 270, 324, 405, 540, 810, 1620]
>>> 
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