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Why enumeration is faster then Iterator ? though we have more advantages with iterator then enumeration.

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Where have you heard this from? –  templatetypedef Jun 14 '12 at 7:55
    
I saw in some site brother some time, now i got this doubt while reading.. –  John Jun 14 '12 at 7:56
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Can you quote the reference of that site? –  verisimilitude Jun 14 '12 at 7:57
    
    
From those blogs: "Enumeration is twice as fast as Iterator and uses very less memory." That is certainly not true in the general case. Don't believe everything you read on any random website. –  Jesper Jun 14 '12 at 8:07
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1 Answer

It worth noting that Enumeration is only available on the older thread safe collections. Using Iterator can be used on any collection and since it doesn't have to be thread safe there is no additional locking overhead.

public static void main(String... args) {
    Vector<Integer> vec = new Vector<>();
    ArrayList<Integer> al = new ArrayList<>();
    polulate(vec);
    polulate(al);
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        long sum1 = enumSumOf(vec);
        long mid1 = System.nanoTime();
        long sum1b = iterSumOf(vec);
        long mid2 = System.nanoTime();
        long sum2 = iterSumOf(al);
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.printf("Each iteration of Enumeration took %,d ns (Vector), Iteration took %,d ns (Vector), Iteration took %,d ns (ArrayList)%n",
                (mid1 - start) / vec.size(), (mid2 - mid1) / vec.size(), (end - mid2) / al.size());
    }
}

private static long enumSumOf(Vector<Integer> vec) {
    long sum = 0;
    for (Enumeration<Integer> e = vec.elements(); e.hasMoreElements(); )
        sum += e.nextElement();
    return sum;
}

private static long iterSumOf(Vector<Integer> al) {
    long sum = 0;
    for (int i : al)
        sum += i;
    return sum;
}

private static long iterSumOf(ArrayList<Integer> al) {
    long sum = 0;
    for (int i : al)
        sum += i;
    return sum;
}

private static void polulate(List<Integer> l) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        l.add(i);
}

prints

Each iteration of Enumeration took 61 ns (Vector), 
    Iteration took 74 ns (Vector), Iteration took 17 ns (ArrayList)
Each iteration of Enumeration took 52 ns (Vector), 
    Iteration took 54 ns (Vector), Iteration took 6 ns (ArrayList)
Each iteration of Enumeration took 52 ns (Vector),  
    Iteration took 54 ns (Vector), Iteration took 6 ns (ArrayList)
Each iteration of Enumeration took 52 ns (Vector),  
    Iteration took 53 ns (Vector), Iteration took 6 ns (ArrayList)
Each iteration of Enumeration took 40 ns (Vector),  
    Iteration took 36 ns (Vector), Iteration took 5 ns (ArrayList)

In the example of the micro-benchmark given, the reason the Enumeration is faster than Iterator is because it is tested first. ;)

The longer answer is that the HotSpot compiler optimises a whole method when a loop has iterated 10,000 times. You can change this with -XX:CompileThreshold=NNNN When you have two loops the same method you can see.

  • The first test is slower because some of the time it was run it wasn't optmised whereas the second loop is optimised before it starts.
  • The second test is slower because the JVM collects optimisation metrics as it runs and uses those metrics to optimise the code. If code is optimised before any metrics are collected it can be much slower.

A simple way to show this is the case is to swap the order of the loops. A better solution is to place each loop in its own method and repeat the test a few times. This ensures they are optimised independently and the results are repeatable.

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