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How would you check if a String was a number before parsing it?

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13  
All the solutions proposed with regular expresions will not work for hexadecimal numbers. –  ojota84 Feb 17 '12 at 12:52

22 Answers 22

up vote 350 down vote accepted

This is generally done with a simple user-defined function (i.e. Roll-your-own "isNumeric" function).

Something like:

public static boolean isNumeric(String str)  
{  
  try  
  {  
    double d = Double.parseDouble(str);  
  }  
  catch(NumberFormatException nfe)  
  {  
    return false;  
  }  
  return true;  
}

However, if you're calling this function a lot, and you expect many of the checks to fail due to not being a number then performance of this mechanism will not be great, since you're relying upon exceptions being thrown for each failure, which is a fairly expensive operation.

An alternative approach may be to use a regular expression to check for validity of being a number:

public static boolean isNumeric(String str)
{
  return str.matches("-?\\d+(\\.\\d+)?");  //match a number with optional '-' and decimal.
}

Be careful with the above RegEx mechanism, though, as it'll fail if your using non-latin (i.e. 0 to 9) digits. For example, arabic digits. This is because the "\d" part of the RegEx will only match [0-9] and effectively isn't internationally numerically aware. (Thanks to OregonGhost for pointing this out!)

Or even another alternative is to use Java's built-in java.text.NumberFormat object to see if, after parsing the string the parser position is at the end of the string. If it is, we can assume the entire string is numeric:

public static boolean isNumeric(String str)
{
  NumberFormat formatter = NumberFormat.getInstance();
  ParsePosition pos = new ParsePosition(0);
  formatter.parse(str, pos);
  return str.length() == pos.getIndex();
}
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5  
Does \d in Java Regex match only latin digits? If it's like .NET regexes, you'll run into a problem with other (e.g. arabic) digits, as explained here: blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2004/03/09/86555.aspx –  OregonGhost Jul 9 '09 at 10:07
3  
the numberFormatter solution is probably only marginally better than catching the NumberFormatException one. I suspect the best way is to use regex one. –  Chii Jul 9 '09 at 11:22
7  
Note that the . in your regex will match any character, not just the decimal separator character. –  jqno Jul 11 '09 at 8:16
4  
+1 for realizing the expense of try/catch. This is actually a horrible approach to use in the long run for repeated use, but really we are stuck with that in Java. –  demongolem Sep 6 '11 at 15:20
2  
@jqno is right - use \\. instead. –  ubuntudroid Feb 27 '12 at 13:56

NumberUtils.isNumber or StringUtils.isNumeric from Apache Commons Lang.

You can also use StringUtils.isNumericSpace which returns true for empty strings and ignores internal spaces in the string. (The linked javadocs contain detailed examples for each method.)

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28  
+1 Why re-invent the wheel. –  Ben Thurley Nov 15 '12 at 22:54
10  
StringUtils.isNumeric() probably wouldn't be appropriate here since it only checks if the string is a sequence of digits. Would be fine for most ints but not so for numbers with decimals, group separators, etc. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 8 '13 at 23:19
    
Pretty old question but just for anyone who is reading for help - StringUtils.isNumeric won't work also if it is empty String. It will return true for empty String for StringUtils.isNumeric(). –  JUG Mar 1 '13 at 3:35
    
@JUG: thx for the heads up. Strange enough, the doc linked says the opposite, maybe because of a newer version (note that the answer was edited just a few days after your comment was posted) –  Adrien Be Feb 5 at 11:58
1  
@JUG: searched into it & that's what I thought, some previous versions ie. Commons Lang version 2.4 stringutils.isNumeric() behaves as you said (return true for empty String) –  Adrien Be Feb 5 at 12:05

As @CraigTP had mentioned in his excellent answer, I also have similar performance concerns on using Exceptions to test whether the string is numerical or not. So I end up splitting the string and use java.lang.Character.isDigit().

public static boolean isNumeric(String str)
{
    for (char c : str.toCharArray())
    {
        if (!Character.isDigit(c)) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

According to the Javadoc, Character.isDigit(char) will correctly recognizes non-Latin digits. Performance-wise, I think a simple N number of comparisons where N is the number of characters in the string would be more computationally efficient than doing a regex matching.

UPDATE: As pointed by Jean-François Corbett in the comment, the above code would only validate positive integers, which covers the majority of my use case. Below is the updated code that correctly validates decimal numbers according to the default locale used in your system, with the assumption that decimal separator only occur once in the string.

public static boolean isStringNumeric( String str )
{
    DecimalFormatSymbols currentLocaleSymbols = DecimalFormatSymbols.getInstance();
    char localeMinusSign = currentLocaleSymbols.getMinusSign();

    if ( !Character.isDigit( str.charAt( 0 ) ) && str.charAt( 0 ) != localeMinusSign ) return false;

    boolean isDecimalSeparatorFound = false;
    char localeDecimalSeparator = currentLocaleSymbols.getDecimalSeparator();

    for ( char c : str.substring( 1 ).toCharArray() )
    {
        if ( !Character.isDigit( c ) )
        {
            if ( c == localeDecimalSeparator && !isDecimalSeparatorFound )
            {
                isDecimalSeparatorFound = true;
                continue;
            }
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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1  
Won't the decimal separator also cause this to fail? –  Jean-François Corbett Jan 6 '12 at 8:55
1  
@Jean-FrançoisCorbett: Good point, I have updated the code with a newer one that accepts decimal separators. –  Ibrahim Arief Mar 13 '12 at 13:33
    
Does -ve sign fail this function? –  java_mouse May 29 '13 at 14:14
    
I think this should be the accepted answer because it is the lightest solution. Using an exception or a regex are both really heavy to check if a string is numeric. Iterating over the characters is nice and simple! –  W.K.S Dec 1 '13 at 10:22
    
The above code accepts a single '-' as numeric and will return true. change first if to something like: boolean isMinus = str.charAt(0) == localeMinusSign; if ((isMinus && str.length() < 2) || ((!isMinus) && !Character.isDigit(str.charAt(0)))) { return false; } –  coder Dec 25 '13 at 20:47

Google's Guava library provides a nice helper method to do this: Ints.tryParse. You use it like Integer.parseInt but it returns null rather than throw an Exception if the string does not parse to a valid integer. Note that it returns Integer, not int, so you have to convert/autobox it back to int.

Example:

String s1 = "22";
String s2 = "22.2";
Integer oInt1 = Ints.tryParse(s1);
Integer oInt2 = Ints.tryParse(s2);

int i1 = -1;
if (oInt1 != null) {
    i1 = oInt1.intValue();
}
int i2 = -1;
if (oInt2 != null) {
    i2 = oInt2.intValue();
}

System.out.println(i1);  // prints 22
System.out.println(i2);  // prints -1

However, as of the current release -- Guava r11 -- it is still marked @Beta.

I haven't benchmarked it. Looking at the source code there is some overhead from a lot of sanity checking but in the end they use Character.digit(string.charAt(idx)), similar, but slightly different from, the answer from @Ibrahim above. There is no exception handling overhead under the covers in their implementation.

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if you are on android, then you should use:

android.text.TextUtils.isDigitsOnly(CharSequence str)

documentation can be found here

keep it simple. mostly everybody can "re-program" (the same thing).

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great comment . It helps a lot . –  osimer pothe Dec 29 '13 at 6:51
1  
This will not work for 123.456 ;( –  kape123 Feb 7 at 0:41
public static boolean isNumeric(String str)
{
    return str.matches("-?\\d+(.\\d+)?");
}

CraigTP's regular expression (shown above) produces some false positives. E.g. "23y4" will be counted as a number because '.' matches any character not the decimal point.

Also it will reject any number with a leading '+'

An alternative which avoids these two minor problems is

public static boolean isNumeric(String str)
{
    return str.matches("[+-]?\\d*(\\.\\d+)?");
}
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this will return true for a single plus "+" or minus "-", and false for "0." –  Carlos Heuberger Sep 17 '11 at 17:16
    
Good catch on the single plus or minus. Is "0." a valid number ? –  user872985 Sep 18 '11 at 8:39
    
"0." is valid for Double.parseDouble() and is a valid literal according the JLS (§3.10.2)! –  Carlos Heuberger Sep 18 '11 at 15:49
    
Creating a regular expressions is costly as well. The regular expression must be created once and reused –  Daniel Nuriyev Feb 3 at 18:17

You can use:

 try
 {
      NumberFormat.getInstance().parse(value)
 }
 catch(ParseException e)
 {
     //Not a number.
 }
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Offered an edit - .getInstance() was missing. +1 as this was the answer I went with when finding this question. –  7SpecialGems Apr 10 '12 at 12:45
    
Costly if used extensibly –  Daniel Nuriyev Feb 3 at 18:17
    
It also will pass if there are garbage characters at the end of value. –  Brian White Feb 26 at 3:11

If you using java to develop Android app, you could using TextUtils.isDigitsOnly function.

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Here was my answer to the problem.

A catch all convenience method which you can use to parse any String with any type of parser: isParsable(Object parser, String str). The parser can be a Class or an object. This will also allows you to use custom parsers you've written and should work for ever scenario, eg:

isParsable(Integer.class, "11");
isParsable(Double.class, "11.11");
Object dateFormater = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("yyyy.MM.dd G 'at' HH:mm:ss z");
isParsable(dateFormater, "2001.07.04 AD at 12:08:56 PDT");

Here's my code complete with method descriptions.

import java.lang.reflect.*;

/**
 * METHOD: isParsable<p><p>
 * 
 * This method will look through the methods of the specified <code>from</code> parameter
 * looking for a public method name starting with "parse" which has only one String
 * parameter.<p>
 * 
 * The <code>parser</code> parameter can be a class or an instantiated object, eg:
 * <code>Integer.class</code> or <code>new Integer(1)</code>. If you use a
 * <code>Class</code> type then only static methods are considered.<p>
 * 
 * When looping through potential methods, it first looks at the <code>Class</code> associated
 * with the <code>parser</code> parameter, then looks through the methods of the parent's class
 * followed by subsequent ancestors, using the first method that matches the criteria specified
 * above.<p>
 * 
 * This method will hide any normal parse exceptions, but throws any exceptions due to
 * programmatic errors, eg: NullPointerExceptions, etc. If you specify a <code>parser</code>
 * parameter which has no matching parse methods, a NoSuchMethodException will be thrown
 * embedded within a RuntimeException.<p><p>
 * 
 * Example:<br>
 * <code>isParsable(Boolean.class, "true");<br>
 * isParsable(Integer.class, "11");<br>
 * isParsable(Double.class, "11.11");<br>
 * Object dateFormater = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("yyyy.MM.dd G 'at' HH:mm:ss z");<br>
 * isParsable(dateFormater, "2001.07.04 AD at 12:08:56 PDT");<br></code>
 * <p>
 * 
 * @param parser    The Class type or instantiated Object to find a parse method in.
 * @param str   The String you want to parse
 * 
 * @return true if a parse method was found and completed without exception
 * @throws java.lang.NoSuchMethodException If no such method is accessible 
 */
public static boolean isParsable(Object parser, String str) {
    Class theClass = (parser instanceof Class? (Class)parser: parser.getClass());
    boolean staticOnly = (parser == theClass), foundAtLeastOne = false;
    Method[] methods = theClass.getMethods();

    // Loop over methods
    for (int index = 0; index < methods.length; index++) {
        Method method = methods[index];

        // If method starts with parse, is public and has one String parameter.
        // If the parser parameter was a Class, then also ensure the method is static. 
        if(method.getName().startsWith("parse") &&
            (!staticOnly || Modifier.isStatic(method.getModifiers())) &&
            Modifier.isPublic(method.getModifiers()) &&
            method.getGenericParameterTypes().length == 1 &&
            method.getGenericParameterTypes()[0] == String.class)
        {
            try {
                foundAtLeastOne = true;
                method.invoke(parser, str);
                return true; // Successfully parsed without exception
            } catch (Exception exception) {
                // If invoke problem, try a different method
                /*if(!(exception instanceof IllegalArgumentException) &&
                   !(exception instanceof IllegalAccessException) &&
                   !(exception instanceof InvocationTargetException))
                        continue; // Look for other parse methods*/

                // Parse method refuses to parse, look for another different method
                continue; // Look for other parse methods
            }
        }
    }

    // No more accessible parse method could be found.
    if(foundAtLeastOne) return false;
    else throw new RuntimeException(new NoSuchMethodException());
}


/**
 * METHOD: willParse<p><p>
 * 
 * A convienence method which calls the isParseable method, but does not throw any exceptions
 * which could be thrown through programatic errors.<p>
 * 
 * Use of {@link #isParseable(Object, String) isParseable} is recommended for use so programatic
 * errors can be caught in development, unless the value of the <code>parser</code> parameter is
 * unpredictable, or normal programtic exceptions should be ignored.<p>
 * 
 * See {@link #isParseable(Object, String) isParseable} for full description of method
 * usability.<p>
 * 
 * @param parser    The Class type or instantiated Object to find a parse method in.
 * @param str   The String you want to parse
 * 
 * @return true if a parse method was found and completed without exception
 * @see #isParseable(Object, String) for full description of method usability 
 */
public static boolean willParse(Object parser, String str) {
    try {
        return isParsable(parser, str);
    } catch(Throwable exception) {
        return false;
    }
}
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17  
+1 for absolut overkill –  dertoni Feb 10 '12 at 12:23
       //only int
        public static boolean isNumber(int num) 
        {
              return (num >= 48 && c <= 57); // 0 - 9
        }

      //is type of number including . - e E 
       public static boolean isNumber(String s) 
       {
          boolean isNumber = true;
          for(int i=0; i < s.length() && isNumber; i++) 
          {
            char c = s.charAt(i);
            isNumber = isNumber & ((c>='0' && c<='9') ||c=='.'||c=='e'||c=='E'||c=='');
          }
         return isInteger;
       }

     //is type of number 
      public static boolean isInteger(String s) 
      {
         boolean isInteger = true;
         for(int i=0;i<s.length() && isInteger; i++) 
         {
           char c = s.charAt(i);
           isInteger = isInteger & ((c>='0' && c<='9'));
         }
        return isInteger;
     }

      public static boolean isNumeric(String s) 
      {
        try
            {
           Double.parseDouble(s);
           return true;
            }
            catch (Exception e) 
            {
           return false;
        }
      }
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Parse it (i.e. with http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/Integer.html#parseInt(java.lang.String) ) and simply catch the exception =)

To clarify: The parseInt function checks if it can parse the number in any case (obviously) and if you want to parse it anyway, you are not going to take any performance hit by actually doing the parsing.

If you would not want to parse it (or parse it very, very rarely) you might wish to do it differently of course.

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Costly if used extensibly –  Daniel Nuriyev Feb 3 at 18:18

Here are two methods that might work. (Without using Exceptions). Note : Java is a pass-by-value by default and a String's value is the address of the String's object data. So , when you are doing

stringNumber = stringNumber.replaceAll(" ", "");

You have changed the input value to have no spaces. You can remove that line if you want.

private boolean isValidStringNumber(String stringNumber)
{
    if(stringNumber.isEmpty())
    {
        return false;
    }

    stringNumber = stringNumber.replaceAll(" ", "");

    char [] charNumber = stringNumber.toCharArray();
    for(int i =0 ; i<charNumber.length ;i++)
    {
        if(!Character.isDigit(charNumber[i]))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Here is another method in case you want to allow floats This method allegedly allows numbers in the form to pass 1,123,123,123,123,123.123 i have just made it , and i think it needs further testing to ensure it is working.

private boolean isValidStringTrueNumber(String stringNumber)
{
    if(stringNumber.isEmpty())
    {
        return false;
    }

    stringNumber = stringNumber.replaceAll(" ", "");
    int countOfDecimalPoint = 0;
    boolean decimalPointPassed = false;
    boolean commaFound = false;
    int countOfDigitsBeforeDecimalPoint = 0;
    int countOfDigitsAfterDecimalPoint =0 ;
    int commaCounter=0;
    int countOfDigitsBeforeFirstComma = 0;

    char [] charNumber = stringNumber.toCharArray();
    for(int i =0 ; i<charNumber.length ;i++)
    {
        if((commaCounter>3)||(commaCounter<0))
        {
            return false;
        }
        if(!Character.isDigit(charNumber[i]))//Char is not a digit.
        {
            if(charNumber[i]==',')
            {
                if(decimalPointPassed)
                {
                    return false;
                }
                commaFound = true;
                //check that next three chars are only digits.
                commaCounter +=3;
            }
            else if(charNumber[i]=='.')
            {
                decimalPointPassed = true;
                countOfDecimalPoint++;
            }
            else
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        else //Char is a digit.
        {
            if ((commaCounter>=0)&&(commaFound))
            {
                if(!decimalPointPassed)
                {
                    commaCounter--;
                }
            }

            if(!commaFound)
            {
                countOfDigitsBeforeFirstComma++;
            }

            if(!decimalPointPassed)
            {
                countOfDigitsBeforeDecimalPoint++;
            }
            else
            {
                countOfDigitsAfterDecimalPoint++;
            }
        }
    }
    if((commaFound)&&(countOfDigitsBeforeFirstComma>3))
    {
        return false;
    }
    if(countOfDecimalPoint>1)
    {
        return false;
    }

    if((decimalPointPassed)&&((countOfDigitsBeforeDecimalPoint==0)||(countOfDigitsAfterDecimalPoint==0)))
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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What if the number contains commas or decimal points? –  ValekHalfHeart Apr 19 '13 at 18:51
    
Oh , Good question. I guess this one only works normal type integers. The method were initially created to filter input phone numbers , and count numbers. –  XForCE07 Apr 19 '13 at 22:01

I modified CraigTP's solution to accept scientific notation and both dot and comma as decimal separators as well

^-?\d+([,\.]\d+)?([eE]-?\d+)?$

example

var re = new RegExp("^-?\d+([,\.]\d+)?([eE]-?\d+)?$");
re.test("-6546"); // true
re.test("-6546355e-4456"); // true
re.test("-6546.355e-4456"); // true, though debatable
re.test("-6546.35.5e-4456"); // false
re.test("-6546.35.5e-4456.6"); // false
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Here is my class for checking if a string is numeric. It also fixes numerical strings:

Features:

  1. Removes unnecessary zeros ["12.0000000" -> "12"]
  2. Removes unnecessary zeros ["12.0580000" -> "12.058"]
  3. Removes non numerical characters ["12.00sdfsdf00" -> "12"]
  4. Makes "," to "." ["12,020000" -> "12.02"]
  5. Handles negative string values ["-12,020000" -> "-12.02"]
  6. Removes multiple dots ["-12.0.20.000" -> "-12.02"]
  7. No extra libraries, just standard Java

Here you go...

public class NumUtils {
    /**
     * Transforms a string to an integer. If no numerical chars returns a String "0".
     *
     * @param str
     * @return retStr
     */
    static String makeToInteger(String str) {
        String s = str;
        double d;
        d = Double.parseDouble(makeToDouble(s));
        int i = (int) (d + 0.5D);
        String retStr = String.valueOf(i);
        System.out.printf(retStr + "   ");
        return retStr;
    }

    /**
     * Transforms a string to an double. If no numerical chars returns a String "0".
     *
     * @param str
     * @return retStr
     */
    static String makeToDouble(String str) {

        Boolean dotWasFound = false;
        String orgStr = str;
        String retStr;
        int firstDotPos = 0;
        Boolean negative = false;

        //check if str is null
        if(str.length()==0){
            str="0";
        }

        //check if first sign is "-"
        if (str.charAt(0) == '-') {
            negative = true;
        }

        //check if str containg any number or else set the string to '0'
        if (!str.matches(".*\\d+.*")) {
            str = "0";
        }

        //Replace ',' with '.'  (for some european users who use the ',' as decimal separator)
        str = str.replaceAll(",", ".");
        str = str.replaceAll("[^\\d.]", "");

        //Removes the any second dots
        for (int i_char = 0; i_char < str.length(); i_char++) {
            if (str.charAt(i_char) == '.') {
                dotWasFound = true;
                firstDotPos = i_char;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (dotWasFound) {
            String befDot = str.substring(0, firstDotPos + 1);
            String aftDot = str.substring(firstDotPos + 1, str.length());
            aftDot = aftDot.replaceAll("\\.", "");
            str = befDot + aftDot;
        }

        //Removes zeros from the begining
        double uglyMethod = Double.parseDouble(str);
        str = String.valueOf(uglyMethod);

        //Removes the .0
        str = str.replaceAll("([0-9])\\.0+([^0-9]|$)", "$1$2");

        retStr = str;

        if (negative) {
            retStr = "-"+retStr;
        }

        return retStr;

    }

    static boolean isNumeric(String str) {
        try {
            double d = Double.parseDouble(str);
        } catch (NumberFormatException nfe) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

}
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I think the only way to reliably tell if a string is a number, is to parse it. So I would just parse it, and if it's a number, you get the number in an int for free!

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That's why I like the Try* approach in .NET. In addition to the traditional Parse method that's like the Java one, you also have a TryParse method. I'm not good in Java syntax (out parameters?), so please treat the following as some kind of pseudo-code. It should make the concept clear though.

boolean TryParseInt(String s, out int number)
{
    try {
        number = Integer.parseInt(myString);
        return true;
    } catch(NumberFormatException e) {
        return false;
    }
}

Usage:

int num;
if (TryParseInt("23", out num)) {
    // Do something with num.
}
share|improve this answer
    
yep, there's no "out parameters" in Java and since the Integer wrapper is immutable (thus cannot be used as a valid reference to store the output), the sensible idiomatic option would be to return an Integer object that could be null if the parse failed. An uglier option could be to pass an int[1] as output parameter. –  fortran Jul 9 '09 at 10:37
    
Yes, I remember a discussion about why Java has no output parameters. but returning an Integer (as null, if needed) would be fine too, I guess, though I don't know about Java's performance with regard to boxing/unboxing. –  OregonGhost Jul 9 '09 at 11:19

An well-performing approach avoiding try-catch and handling negative numbers and scientific notation.

Pattern PATTERN = Pattern.compile( "^(-?0|-?[1-9]\\d*)(\\.\\d+)?(E\\d+)?$" );

public static boolean isNumeric( String value ) 
{
    return value != null && PATTERN.matcher( value ).matches();
}
share|improve this answer

You could use BigDecimal if the string may contain decimals:

try {
    new java.math.BigInteger(testString);
} catch(NumberFormatException e) {
    throw new RuntimeException("Not a valid number");
}
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4  
Welcome to stackoverflow. Generally, it is best to avoid resurrecting old threads unless the response adds something significantly different to the thread. While valid, that approach was already mentioned in the accepted answer. –  Leigh Apr 6 '12 at 21:28

If you want to do the check using a regex you should create a final static Pattern object, that way the regex only needs to be compiled once. Compiling the regex takes about as long as performing the match so by taking this precaution you'll cut the execution time of the method in half.

final static Pattern NUMBER_PATTERN = Pattern.compile("[+-]?\\d*\\.?\\d+");

static boolean isNumber(String input) {
    Matcher m = NUMBER_PATTERN.matcher(input);
    return m.matches();
}

I'm assuming a number is a string with nothing but decimal digits in it, possibly a + or - sign at the start and at most one decimal point (not at the end) and no other characters (including commas, spaces, numbers in other counting systems, Roman numerals, hieroglyphs).

This solution is succinct and pretty fast but you can shave a couple of milliseconds per million invocations by doing it like this

static boolean isNumber(String s) {
    final int len = s.length();
    if (len == 0) {
        return false;
    }
    int dotCount = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        char c = s.charAt(i);
        if (c < '0' || c > '9') {
            if (i == len - 1) {//last character must be digit
                return false;
            } else if (c == '.') {
                if (++dotCount > 1) {
                    return false;
                }
            } else if (i != 0 || c != '+' && c != '-') {//+ or - allowed at start
                return false;
            }

        }
    }
    return true;
}
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To match only positive base-ten integers, that contains only ASCII digits, use:

public static boolean isNumeric(String maybeNumeric) {
    return maybeNumeric != null && maybeNumeric.matches("[0-9]+");
}
share|improve this answer

This a simple example for this check

public static boolean isNumericString(String input){
    boolean result = false;
    if(input!=null && input.length()>0){
        char[] charArray = input.toCharArray();
        for(char c : charArray){
            if(c>='0' && c<='9'){
                //it is a digit
                result = true;
            }else{
                result = false;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    return result;
}
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import java.util.Scanner;
public class TestDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        boolean flag = true;
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter the String :");
        String str = sc.nextLine();

        for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
            if(str.charAt(i)>48 && str.charAt(i)<58){
                flag = false;
                break;
            }
        }
        if(flag==true){
            System.out.println("String is a valid String..");
        }else{
            System.out.println("String contains number");
        }
    }
}
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