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I'm trying to learn C, and now I'm playing with structures. I have the following piece of code:

#include <string.h>

struct user {
  unsigned int utime;
  char *username;
};

void main()
{
  char username[] = "root";
  struct user *u;
  strcpy(u->username, username);
}

But, when I try to run it, it generates a Segmentation fault. What's wrong with it?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

u is a pointer to a struct but you didn't allocate any memory for it yet. The line must be struct user *u = malloc(sizeof(struct user)). Additionally you will also have to allocate memory for the username pointer within your struct before calling strcpy.

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1  
Or just use a stack allocated struct user (but memory for username still required to by dynamically allocated). –  hmjd Jun 14 '12 at 8:44

The first thing you should do when getting a crash (like segmentation fault), is to run your program in a debugger. It will help you pinpoint the location of the crash, and also let you examine variables to see what might have caused the crash.

However, in your case it's very simple:

struct user *u;
strcpy(u->username, username);

You haven't allocated memory for u or u->username, which means that u can point to anywhere in memory and the same for u->username.

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another way would be to use u as a simple variable: struct user u; and then access to utime or username with the ".", like this:

u.utime = ...;
u.username = ...;
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Two things

you have not allocated for the structure variable "struct user *u;"

and also you have not allocated memory for *username in the structore

To work

 #include <string.h>
 struct user {
 unsigned int utime;
 char *username;
 };

 void main()
 {
    char username[] = "root";
    struct user *u=malloc(sizeof(struct user));
    u->username=malloc(strlen(username)+1);
    strcpy(u->username, username);
}  

Please ignore if it has any syntax errors

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1  
In pure C, return value of malloc doesn't have to be type-casted. –  LihO Jun 14 '12 at 8:46
    
@LihO I think we should, becuase malloc return type is void*. May be you ll get warning –  Sudhakar B Jun 14 '12 at 8:48
1  
When allocating memory for the string, it should be strlen(username) + 1, so you get space for the terminating '\0' too. Or use strdup instead of malloc and strcpy. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 14 '12 at 8:49
    
Have a look at Do I cast the result of malloc? –  LihO Jun 14 '12 at 8:50

In parallel, you should also know about memory layout, and try reasoning what lives where. A starting point for this would be -Stanford Pointers pdf I would suggest,when you are learning and get stuck,try drawing the flow, memory access on paper and then go into the debugger. I didn't do this when I learnt C first- Memory Visualization is a trait that seeems to make a person a better programmer/debugger- from what I have learnt from my colleagues/ read several articles online.

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