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Currently have the following scheme, where I have designated a package named /source, which contains a python file, get.py, that pulls data from the internet and generates a series of text files that is stored in a directory called /txt and returns data in a data structure

final.py can either:

1) import source, and make a call to get.py which would return the content of the text files stored in a data structure. get.py() also writes the contents of the data structure to /text/*.txt

2) retrieve /source/text/data.txt without a call to get.py, which should have equivalent behavior, but the information is from a previous call to get.py (off-line mode)

final.py
/source
    __init__.py
    get.py #returns a data structure and writes to /text/data.txt
        /text
            data.txt
            data1.txt
            data2.txt

While this is all well and good, I can't help but think I am violating some important abstraction rules, mainly I am retrieving /source/text/data.txt without ever having to import the source package. And if this is the case, why create packages with init.py at all? How should a python package with the above scheme be organized?

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marked as duplicate by Mariusz Jamro, Bakuriu, Fabio Antunes, dax, watcher Mar 26 '14 at 16:14

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1 Answer 1

Your main 'violation' is that your data is now in the same directories as your code. These should not be mixed: applications should store their data elsewhere (in a configuration directory or in a designated directory for that purpose).

I suggest organizing it as follows:

final.py
/source
    __init__.py
    get.py
/text
    data.txt
    data1.txt
    data2.txt

You can now perform all your operations by executing final.py (possibly with parameters) which can then import the source or data and do what it needs to do.

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Yes, as long as get.py knows where to write and the directory is writeable then it can write. You should probably specify the full path instead of a relative path to get.py but that's okay. –  Simeon Visser Jun 14 '12 at 10:08

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