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This may seem a bit crazy, but if you can tell me a better way please do. I need a webservice that will display the mercurial revision number for the current version.

I have a very simple batch file that writes this number to a text file

cd C:\inetpub\wwwroot\MyWebsite
hg identify --num > services\version.txt 

and a method that should call the batch file then read the contents of the file and, for now, write to screen (I'm doing it in a web page, but will migrate to a simple service later)

Private Sub GetVersionNumber()
    Dim versionFile = Server.MapPath("~/services/version.txt")
    Dim batchFile = Server.MapPath("~/services/version.bat")
    Process.Start(batchFile)

    Dim revision As String = String.Empty
    Using reader As New StreamReader(versionFile)
        Do While reader.Peek() <> -1
            revision = reader.ReadLine()
        Loop
    End Using
    Response.Write(revision)
End Sub

I have granted Everyone write access to the services directory and explicitly on version.txt, but when I hit the page the version.txt file is always empty. If I have the file open in notepad++ when I do then I get a message saying the file has been modified by another program, do I want to reload it. When I do it's empty. If I set some text in the file and save it then visit the web page again the contents of my text file are wiped out.

I had this in a try/catch block but no exception was thrown, so I've removed it (for clarity).

Ultimately all I need is to get the results of
hg identify --num
to display as a string on the web page/service which will be called by a separate SharePoint site

share|improve this question
    
Note by the way, you can configure a Mercurial update hook to invoke your identify command automatically every time the working copy updates. – Laurens Holst Jun 14 '12 at 17:39
    
So that could update the text file? Which would mean it didn't need to happen each time the page was called... that would be better. How would that work? – Simon Martin Jun 14 '12 at 18:03
1  
Yeah. Add something like the following to the [hooks] section of the repository’s .hg\hgrc file: update.writeversion = hg identify --num > services\version.txt. More info: hgbook.red-bean.com/read/…, mercurial.selenic.com/wiki/Hook and selenic.com/mercurial/hgrc.5.html#hooks – Laurens Holst Jun 15 '12 at 8:48
    
update.writeversion = hg identify --num > website\services\version.txt is the answer I was looking for! Add it as an answer so I can accept it – Simon Martin Jun 15 '12 at 9:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Instead of manually invoking the batch file from your web server every time the page is requested, you can configure a Mercurial update hook to invoke your identify command automatically every time the working copy updates.

For example, add this to the repository’s .hg\hgrc file:

[hooks]
update.writeversion = hg identify --num > services\version.txt

Some links with additional info on hooks:

share|improve this answer

The reason the batch file is empty is that a process kicked off and run in this manner can only be alive as long as the parent thread is alive. Also, using Process.Start does not wait for that process to finish. As specified in the documentation, the return of this method is a boolean indicating that the process did or didn't start. Since you're treating it as a void, as soon as the process starts your program keeps right on running and finishes (since it's a web service).

Once your web service exits the sub, the thread is terminated and all children processes are terminated along with it. Specifically, the cmd.exe which is currently running your batch file is terminated before it can ever really get going since your streamreader is reading an empty file.

If you can guarantee that your batch file will process fairly quickly you might try to get away with using Thread.Sleep to cause the web service call to pause long enough for that batch file to finish processing, but this is always going to be a race condition.

share|improve this answer
    
I added a Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000) after calling Process.Start but that hasn't changed the result. The text file still says it's been changed, but there is no content. The batch file runs almost instantly, when I call the batch from a command line and results in the text file having contents "740" (the current version number) – Simon Martin Jun 14 '12 at 10:47
    
@SimonMartin: Like I said, it's a race condition that your web service may not ever win. Keep in mind that in addition to the batch file running, it has to spool up cmd.exe and if it encounters a conflict with the file (web service has it open for instance) it will not report an error. You also might want to look into the UseShellExecute property. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – Joel Etherton Jun 14 '12 at 10:56
    
The Process seems pretty quick, I extended the sleep to 15000 but the text file gets 'changed' long before that time is up. It was getting 'changed' before the 2000 sleep too – Simon Martin Jun 14 '12 at 11:03
    
@SimonMartin: If the file is being changed, then the problem has to rest within your batch file itself. Nothing in your code is causing a change to the file. So if the batch file is kicking off, changing the file but not producing the results you want, you should probably look there. – Joel Etherton Jun 14 '12 at 11:08
    
When I run the batch file from a command prompt it works as expected - so the batch file works. If you had to write the results of a command to a file then read that back how would you approach it? – Simon Martin Jun 14 '12 at 11:11

I would call Mercurial directly and read from its standard output stream:

var hg = new ProcessStartInfo("C:\Program Files\Mercurial\hg.exe", "identify --num -R c:\inetpub\webroot");
hg.RedirectStandardOutput = True;
hg.RedirectStandardInput = True;
hg.UseShellExecute = False;
hg.CreateNoWindow = True;

var hgProc = New Process()
hgProc.StartInfo = hg
hgProc.Start()

var repoID = hgProc.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd()
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