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I'm supposed to program in Python, and I've only used Python for 3 weeks. I have to solve all kinds of problems and write functions as training. For one of my functions I use this line.

theDict = dict( [(k,v) for k,v in theDict.items() if len(v)>0])

However I can't use anything I don't fully understand or can't fully explain. I understand the gist of the line, but, I can't really explain it. So my instructor told me that to use this, i must learn ether everything about tuples and fully understand list comprehension, or i must write that in pure python.

The line basically looks into a dictionary, and inside the dictionary, its supposed to look for values that are equal to empty lists and delete those keys/values.

So, my question is, what would this line look like in pure, non list comprehension python? I'll attempt to write it because I want to try my best, and this isn't a website where you get free answers, but you guys correct me and help me finish it if it doesn't work.

Also another problem is that, the empty lists inside the 'value' of the dictionary, if they are empty, then they won't be processed inside the loop. The loop is supposed to delete the key that is equal to the empty value. So how are you supposed to check if the list is empty, if the check is inside the loop, and the loop won't have the empty array in its body?

for key,value in TheDict.items(): #i need to add 'if value:' somewhere, 
#but i don't know how to add it to make it work, because 
#this checks if the value exists or not, but if the value 
#doesn't exist, then it won't go though this area, so 
#there is no way to see if the value exists or not. 
     theDict[key]=value

If there is a better method to remove dictionary values that have a value of an empty list. please let me know.

And how will

theDict = dict( [(k,v) for k,v in theDict.items() if len(v)>0])

look like if it didn't use a generator?

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2  
@WebMaster, The dict constructor knows how to consume a generator expression. The result will be the same as with the LC, but not using so much temporary memory –  gnibbler Jun 14 '12 at 11:03
7  
This is pure Python. Your instructor doesn't know what he's talking about –  gnibbler Jun 14 '12 at 11:04
1  
You should accept the answers which have been helpful to you so far, in order to get more help from other users... –  avasal Jun 14 '12 at 11:27
2  
1. Why do you have "an instructor" in a job scenario? 2. If you have to get help on the internet with this sort of thing in order to keep a job, I have zero sympathy for you; the company is paying real money for someone who can do this sort of thing themselves. –  Karl Knechtel Jun 14 '12 at 11:29
2  
but they put me on python, didn't even let me choose, just said, do python - Sounds like good advice –  MattH Jun 14 '12 at 13:02
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8 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
result = dict([(k,v) for k,v in theDict.items() if len(v)>0])

will look like(if you want new dictionary)

result = {}
for key, value in theDict.items():
    if len(value) > 0:
        result[key] = value

if you want to modify existing dictionary:

for key, value in theDict.items():
    if not len(value) > 0:
        del theDict[key]
share|improve this answer
    
There is a problem! since the VALUE is EQUAL to an empty list. the program will not loop THOUGH an empty list. so the if value: WILL NEVER be triggered. –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 10:55
1  
No, the line for key, value in theDict.items(): doesn't care if the strings stored in the dictionary are empty or not. –  Rodrigo Queiro Jun 14 '12 at 10:59
1  
you should use if len(value)>0: to guarantee the same behaviour –  gnibbler Jun 14 '12 at 11:08
    
@gnibbler: I'm not sure that I understand what you mean –  cval Jun 14 '12 at 11:13
2  
Simple not very good example - Suppose there is a value of None. This would cause an exception, but in your code it will be silently ignored –  gnibbler Jun 14 '12 at 11:18
show 14 more comments

if v signifies if v has some value, if v donesn't have any value, control will not enter the condition and skip the value

In [25]: theDict={'1':'2','3':'', '4':[]}

In [26]: for k,v in theDict.items():
   ....:     if v:
   ....:         newDict[k]=v
   ....:

In [27]: newDict
Out[27]: {'1': '2'}

==========================

In [2]: theDict = { 1: ['e', 'f'], 2: ['a', 'b', 'c'], 4: ['d', ' '], 5: [] }

In [3]: newDict = {}

In [4]: for k,v in theDict.items():
   ...:     if v:
   ...:         newDict[k]=v
   ...:

In [5]: newDict
Out[5]: {1: ['e', 'f'], 2: ['a', 'b', 'c'], 4: ['d', ' ']}

Updated the answer as per your input...

share|improve this answer
    
does it work with { 1: ['e', 'f'], 2: ['a', 'b', 'c'], 4: ['d', ' '], 5: [] } –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 10:58
    
Please let me know, what is your expected output for the given dictionary... –  avasal Jun 14 '12 at 11:03
    
This specific function is only supposed to remove keys that have the value of '[]' For example KEY 5 has the VALUE of '[]' so key 5:[] must be delete and everything else must be returned in the same except way except with the key 5 missing. THANK YOU. sorry for slow reply, thank you again, i really hope your still online –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 11:13
    
Updated the answer as per your input.. check... –  avasal Jun 14 '12 at 11:18
    
what does ...: mean? –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 11:44
show 1 more comment

Just for fun:

from operator import itemgetter
theDict = dict(filter(itemgetter(1), theDict.items()))
share|improve this answer
    
what does that do lol –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 11:50
    
@WebMaster, maybe your instructor can explain it to you :) –  gnibbler Jun 14 '12 at 22:03
    
he only asks questions –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 23:13
add comment

To remove an element from a dictionary, you can use the del keyword:

>>> d = {1: 2, 3: 4}
>>> d
{1: 2, 3: 4}
>>> del d[1]
>>> d
{3: 4}
>>> 

This will probably be more efficient than generating a completely new dictionary. Then, you can use a similar structure to above:

for k in theDict:
    if len(theDict[k]) == 0:
        del theDict[k]

Does that make sense?

share|improve this answer
    
yes, but it doesn't work. since value is blank, it never iterates over any kind of loop. this only works with my list comprehension example that i can't use –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 11:50
add comment
theDict = dict( [(k,v) for k,v in theDict.items() if len(v)>0])

However I can't use anything I don't fully understand or can't fully explain. I understand the gist of the line, but, I can't really explain it.


Background

The easiest way to understand or demo behaviour in python is using the interactive interpreter:
python -i

In the interactive interpreter there are two fabulously useful commands:

  • dir - takes an optional argument of an object, returns a list of the attributes on the object.
  • help - accesses inline documentation

You can use dir to find out, for example what methods an object has and then look at their documentation using help.


Explaining the line in question

Here's a sample dictionary:

>>> theDict = dict(a=[1,2],b=[3,4],c=[])
>>> theDict
{'a': [1, 2], 'c': [], 'b': [3, 4]}

The list comprehension returns a list of key-value pairs as tuples:

>>> [(k,v) for k,v in theDict.items()]
[('a', [1, 2]), ('c', []), ('b', [3, 4])]

The if statement filters the resulting list.

>>> [(k,v) for k,v in theDict.items() if len(v) > 0]
[('a', [1, 2]), ('b', [3, 4])]

The dict can be instantiated with a sequence of key-value pairs:

>>> dict([(k,v) for k,v in theDict.items() if len(v) > 0])
{'a': [1, 2], 'b': [3, 4]}

Putting it all together:

>>> theDict = dict(a=[1,2],b=[3,4],c=[])
>>> theDict
{'a': [1, 2], 'c': [], 'b': [3, 4]}
>>> theDict = dict([(k,v) for k,v in theDict.items() if len(v) > 0])
>>> theDict
{'a': [1, 2], 'b': [3, 4]}

The original dict object is replaced with a new one instantiated using the list comprehension filtered list of it's key-value pairs.

If you follow all this (and play with it yourself in the interactive interpreter) you will understand what's going on in this line of code you've asked about.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, ill take my time to read this thoroughly. i updated my overall program in the post, still doesn't work :( –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 14:07
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What you probably want is a defaultdict with a list as the empty value.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean? and i need to delete the lists with empty value along with the key that is with it –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 12:58
add comment

Here's your function in a more or less readable way:

def clean_whitespace(dct):
    out = {}
    for key, val in dct.items():
        val = map(str.strip, val)
        val = filter(None, val)
        if val:
            out[key] = val
    return out

or, using comprehensions,

def clean_whitespace(dct):
    out = {}
    for key, val in dct.items():
        val = [x.strip() for x in val]
        val = [x for x in val if x]
        if val:
            out[key] = val
    return out

Let us know if you need comments or explanations.

share|improve this answer
    
i reposted my new function, still doesn't work, but ill take my time to go though this post here. –  Web Master Jun 14 '12 at 14:09
add comment

the solution was under my nose. sorry guys. thank you for all your help +1 for everyone

def CleanWhiteSpace(theDict) :
    for k,v in theDict.items():
        if not v:
            del theDict[k]
    return theDict
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