Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We've got a query that is taking a very long time to complete with a large dataset. I think I've tracked it down to a table-value function in the SQL server.

The query is designed to return the difference in printing usage between two dates. So if a printer had usage of 100 at date x and 200 at date y a row needs to be returned which reflects that it has had a usage change of 100.

These readings are taken periodically (but not every day) and stored in a table called MeterReadings. The code for the table-value function is below. This is then called from another SQL query which joins the returned table on a devices table with an inner join to get extra device information.

Any advise as to how to optimise the below would be appreciated.

ALTER FUNCTION [dbo].[DeviceUsage]
-- Add the parameters for the stored procedure here
( @StartDate DateTime , @EndDate DateTime )
RETURNS table
AS
RETURN
(

SELECT      MAX(dbo.MeterReadings.ScanDateTime) AS MX,
        MAX(dbo.MeterReadings.DeviceTotal - reading.DeviceTotal) AS TotalDiff, 
        MAX(dbo.MeterReadings.TotalCopy - reading.TotalCopy) AS CopyDiff,
        MAX(dbo.MeterReadings.TotalPrint - reading.TotalPrint) AS PrintDiff,
        MAX(dbo.MeterReadings.TotalScan - reading.TotalScan) AS ScanDiff,
        MAX(dbo.MeterReadings.TotalFax - reading.TotalFax) AS FaxDiff,
        MAX(dbo.MeterReadings.TotalMono - reading.TotalMono) AS MonoDiff,
        MAX(dbo.MeterReadings.TotalColour - reading.TotalColour) AS ColourDiff, 
        MIN(reading.ScanDateTime) AS MN, dbo.MeterReadings.DeviceID

FROM        dbo.MeterReadings INNER JOIN (SELECT * FROM dbo.MeterReadings WHERE     
        (dbo.MeterReadings.ScanDateTime > @StartDate) AND 
        (dbo.MeterReadings.ScanDateTime < @EndDate) ) 
        AS reading ON dbo.MeterReadings.DeviceID = reading.DeviceID

WHERE       (dbo.MeterReadings.ScanDateTime > @StartDate) AND (dbo.MeterReadings.ScanDateTime < @EndDate)

GROUP BY    dbo.MeterReadings.DeviceID);
share|improve this question
    
This function only does what you ask for if the values are only ever increasing. Can any of the values ever decrease from one date to the next? –  MatBailie Jun 14 '12 at 11:03
    
Also, if there is a reading on the 1st, then the 3rd, but your @startDate is the 2nd, which date should supply the first reading? My understanding is that it should be the 1st, but the code here uses the 3rd. –  MatBailie Jun 14 '12 at 11:08
    
Thanks for the reply. There is a field that is set to false if a reading goes down so I can filter that out fairly easily. In the context of the application I would not ever expect the usage to go down. Also in reply to your second point, your assumption is correct. The query should return from the 1st. –  Tom Jun 14 '12 at 12:41
    
Your example code was using the 3rd, not the 1st. And as the answers here are based on your example, they do the same. I'll edit my answer to show how to do that, but it will inevitably give different results from your current function. –  MatBailie Jun 14 '12 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

On the assumption that a value can only ever increase over time, it can certainly be simplified.

SELECT
  DeviceID,
  MIN(ScanDateTime)                      AS MN,
  MAX(ScanDateTime)                      AS MX,
  MAX(DeviceTotal ) - MIN(DeviceTotal)   AS TotalDiff,
  MAX(TotalCopy   ) - MIN(TotalCopy  )   AS CopyDiff,
  MAX(TotalPrint  ) - MIN(TotalPrint )   AS PrintDiff,
  MAX(TotalScan   ) - MIN(TotalScan  )   AS ScanDiff,
  MAX(TotalFax    ) - MIN(TotalFax   )   AS FaxDiff,
  MAX(TotalMono   ) - MIN(TotalMono  )   AS MonoDiff,
  MAX(TotalColour ) - MIN(TotalColour)   AS ColourDiff
FROM
  dbo.MeterReadings
WHERE
      ScanDateTime > @StartDate
  AND ScanDateTime < @EndDate
GROUP BY
  DeviceID

This assumes that if you have reading on dates 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 and you want to report on 2 -> 8 then you want reading 7 - reading 3. I would have thought you wanted reading 7 - reading 1?

The above query should be fine for relatively small ranges. If you have Huge ranges of time, the MAX() - MIN() will be operating on large numbers of rows. This can then possibly be improved even further with the following (with correlated sub-queries to lookup just the two rows that you want).

As a side benefit, this also works even if the values can go down as well as up.

(I assume the existance of a Device table for a simpler query and faster performance.)

SELECT
  Device.DeviceID,
  start.ScanDateTime                      AS MN,
  finish.ScanDateTime                     AS MX,
  finish.DeviceTotal - start.DeviceTotal  AS TotalDiff,
  finish.TotalCopy   - start.TotalCopy    AS CopyDiff,
  finish.TotalPrint  - start.TotalPrint   AS PrintDiff,
  finish.TotalScan   - start.TotalScan    AS ScanDiff,
  finish.TotalFax    - start.TotalFax     AS FaxDiff,
  finish.TotalMono   - start.TotalMono    AS MonoDiff,
  finish.TotalColour - start.TotalColour  AS ColourDiff
FROM
  dbo.Device                 AS device
INNER JOIN
  dbo.MeterReadings          AS start
    ON  start.DeviceID = device.DeviceID
    AND start.ScanDateTime = (SELECT MIN(ScanDateTime)
                                FROM dbo.MeterReadings
                               WHERE DeviceID = device.DeviceID
                                 AND ScanDateTime > @startDate
                                 AND ScanDateTime < @endDate)
INNER JOIN
  dbo.MeterReadings          AS finish
    ON  finish.DeviceID     = device.DeviceID
    AND finish.ScanDateTime = (SELECT MAX(ScanDateTime)
                                FROM dbo.MeterReadings
                               WHERE DeviceID = device.DeviceID
                                 AND ScanDateTime > @startDate
                                 AND ScanDateTime < @endDate)

This can also be modified to pick up the start as being the first date on or before @startDate, if required.

EDIT: Modification to pick the start reading as being for the first date on or before @startDate.

SELECT
  Device.DeviceID,
  start.ScanDateTime                                                AS MN,
  finish.ScanDateTime                                               AS MX,
  COALESCE(finish.DeviceTotal, 0) - COALESCE(start.DeviceTotal, 0)  AS TotalDiff,
  COALESCE(finish.TotalCopy  , 0) - COALESCE(start.TotalCopy  , 0)  AS CopyDiff,
  COALESCE(finish.TotalPrint , 0) - COALESCE(start.TotalPrint , 0)  AS PrintDiff,
  COALESCE(finish.TotalScan  , 0) - COALESCE(start.TotalScan  , 0)  AS ScanDiff,
  COALESCE(finish.TotalFax   , 0) - COALESCE(start.TotalFax   , 0)  AS FaxDiff,
  COALESCE(finish.TotalMono  , 0) - COALESCE(start.TotalMono  , 0)  AS MonoDiff,
  COALESCE(finish.TotalColour, 0) - COALESCE(start.TotalColour, 0)  AS ColourDiff
FROM
  dbo.Device                 AS device
LEFT JOIN
  dbo.MeterReadings          AS start
    ON  start.DeviceID = device.DeviceID
    AND start.ScanDateTime = (SELECT MAX(ScanDateTime)
                                FROM dbo.MeterReadings
                               WHERE DeviceID = device.DeviceID
                                 AND ScanDateTime < @startDate)
LEFT JOIN
  dbo.MeterReadings          AS finish
    ON  finish.DeviceID     = device.DeviceID
    AND finish.ScanDateTime = (SELECT MAX(ScanDateTime)
                                FROM dbo.MeterReadings
                               WHERE DeviceID = device.DeviceID
                                 AND ScanDateTime < @endDate)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much. This answer was perfect. You were correct - this has cut the query time down immensely. –  Tom Jun 14 '12 at 12:57
    
Ah yes, thanks I see where the previous query was going wrong. All working as it should be now, many thanks. –  Tom Jun 15 '12 at 7:54

Your query seems to compute a cross-product of all readings in a time range for each particular device. This works semantically because the MIN and MAX aggregates don't care about duplicates. But this is very slow. If you are comparing 100 dates with themselves you need to process 10,000 rows.

I suggest you calculate the MIN and MAX values for each metric/column over the entire time interval and then subtract them. That way you don't need to join and you need a single pass ofer the data. Like this:

select Diff = MAX(col) - MIN(col)
from readings
group by DeviceID
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.