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I am creating a database table with the following sql:

CREATE  TABLE `cs3_ds1` (
`ID` INT NOT NULL ,
`TIME` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL ,
`USER` VARCHAR(45) NOT NULL ,
`TIME1` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL ,
`TIME2` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL ,
`INSERT_TIME` TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ,
 PRIMARY KEY (`ID`) )
 ENGINE = InnoDB

Although I am using the current timestamp as default in one column only, But I am getting the following error:

ERROR 1293: Incorrect table definition; there can be only one TIMESTAMP column with    CURRENT_TIMESTAMP in DEFAULT or ON UPDATE clause

why I am getting this error?

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Are you sure you want that column to be NULLable as well as having a default? –  MatBailie Jun 14 '12 at 11:37
    
@Dems Sorry about that, it should be NOT NULL. But i was trying different things to see if it works. –  Sam Jun 14 '12 at 11:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

MySQL auto initialises TIMESTAMP Columns with DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, so your first column TIME has the CURRENT_TIMESTAMP Added as default. Therefore by the time you explicitly add a DEFAULT to a column one already exists. You either need to change the order your columns are defined:

CREATE  TABLE `silas`.`cs3_ds1` (
`ID` INT NOT NULL ,
`INSERT_TIME` TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ,
`TIME` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL ,
`USER` VARCHAR(45) NOT NULL ,
`TIME1` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL ,
`TIME2` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL ,
 PRIMARY KEY (`ID`) )
 ENGINE = InnoDB

Or add defaults to your other timestamp columns:

CREATE  TABLE `silas`.`cs3_ds1` (
`ID` INT NOT NULL ,
`TIME` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,
`USER` VARCHAR(45) NOT NULL  DEFAULT 0,
`TIME1` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT 0 ,
`TIME2` TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT 0 ,
`INSERT_TIME` TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ,
 PRIMARY KEY (`ID`) )
 ENGINE = InnoDB

See the MySQL Docs for further information.

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I recently ran into this error also, but that's because I'm running < PHP 5.6.5. According to the docs for PHP 5.6.5, this restriction has been lifted:

Previously, at most one TIMESTAMP column per table could be automatically initialized or updated to the current date and time. This restriction has been lifted. Any TIMESTAMP column definition can have any combination of DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP and ON UPDATE
CURRENT_TIMESTAMP clauses. In addition, these clauses now can be used with DATETIME column definitions. For more information, see Automatic Initialization and Updating for TIMESTAMP and DATETIME.

See MySQL's docs for more information. Specifically under the "Data Type Nodes" section if you follow this link: Changes in MySQL 5.6.5

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