Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the following tables

      orders
      +----+---------+---------+
      | id | user_id | details |
      +----+---------+---------+  
      | 1  |    2    | blue    | 
      +----+---------+---------+
      | 2  |    1    | red     | 
      +----+---------+---------+
      | 3  |    2    | yellow  | 
      +----+---------+---------+
      | 4  |    2    | cyan    | 
      +----+---------+---------+

      users
      +---------+---------+---------+
      | user_id |    ph   |   name  | 
      +---------+---------+---------+
      |   1     |   123   |   fred  | 
      +---------+---------+---------+
      |   2     |   456   |   Stan  | 
      +---------+---------+---------+
      |   3     |   189   |   Levi  | 
      +---------+---------+---------+

I know how to select only one occurance of each user in the first table using distinct

     SELECT DISTINCT user_id FROM orders

How could I pull just the phone number from users?

I could probably go for a loop and pick out each number like...

     SELECT ph from users WHERE user_id = user_id

Can't help thinking there might be a one liner query I could use.

result would be

     123
     456
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Selecting Distinctively from the Orders table might be a heavy operation. Depending on how massive that table is going to become.

Maybe this one will be faster:

Select u.ph 
  from users u 
  where exists (select id from orders where user_id = u.user_id);
share|improve this answer

Correlated subqueries will be much slower than if done using a JOIN which can join on indexes if you have them defined:

SELECT
    a.ph
FROM
    users a
INNER JOIN
    orders b ON a.user_id = b.user_id
GROUP BY
    a.user_id,
    a.ph
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.