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It seems a very basic question but I couldn't find any resolution for it. I have following code with me:

package com.test.db.util;

import java.sql.Connection;
import java.sql.DriverManager;
import java.sql.PreparedStatement;
import java.sql.ResultSet;
import java.sql.SQLException;
import java.sql.Statement;

public class JDBCConnect
{
private Connection conn = null;
private final String uname = "root";
private final String passwd = "test@123";
private String url = "jdbc:mysql://127.0.0.1:3306/TrainDB";
private final String className = "com.mysql.jdbc.Driver";

public void initConnection()
{
    try
    {
        if(this.conn == null || this.conn.isClosed())
        {
            try
            {
                Class.forName (className).newInstance ();
                this.conn = DriverManager.getConnection(url, uname, passwd);
                System.out.println("database connection established.");
            }
            catch(SQLException sqe)
            {
                sqe.printStackTrace();
            }
            catch (InstantiationException e) 
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } 
            catch (IllegalAccessException e) 
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } 
            catch (ClassNotFoundException e) 
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }

        }
    }
    catch(SQLException sqle)
    {
        sqle.printStackTrace();
    }
    //return this.conn;
}

public void disconnect()
{
    if (conn != null)
        {
            try
            {
                conn.close ();
                System.out.println ("Database connection terminated");
            }
            catch (Exception e) { /* ignore close errors */ }
        }

}

public void insertData(String sql)
{
    PreparedStatement s;
    try
    {

        if(conn == null || conn.isClosed())
        {
            initConnection();
        }
        s = conn.prepareStatement(sql);
        int count = s.executeUpdate ();
        s.close ();
        System.out.println (count + " rows were inserted");
    } 
    catch (SQLException e) 
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
        if (conn != null)
        {
            try
            {
                conn.close ();
                System.out.println ("Database connection terminated");
            }
            catch (Exception se) { /* ignore close errors */ }
        }
    }

}

public ResultSet query(String sql)
{
    Statement s = null;
    try
    {
        if(this.conn == null || this.conn.isClosed())
        {
            initConnection();
        }

                    s = conn.createStatement();
        s.executeQuery(sql);
        ResultSet rs = s.getResultSet();
        System.out.println("lets see " + rs.getFetchSize());
        return rs;
    }
    catch(SQLException sq)
    {
        System.out.println("Error in query");
        return null;
    }
    finally
    {
        try {
            s.close();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }
}
}

I am using JDBCConnect in a different class:

import java.sql.ResultSet;
import java.sql.SQLException;

public class traininfo
{

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    JDBCConnect jdbcConn = new JDBCConnect();

    String sql = "SELECT id FROM testtable";
    ResultSet rs = jdbcConn.query(sql);
    try {
        System.out.println(rs.getFetchSize());
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    if(rs != null)
    {
        try
        {
            while(rs.next())
            {
                System.out.println(rs.getString("id"));
            }
            rs.close();
        }
        catch(SQLException sqe)
        {

        }
    }
    jdbcConn.disconnect();
}
}

I am not using concurrent calls for insertion and reads. If I use the same query in mysql-workbench (client), I am getting proper results but using the mentioned code, I am getting

database connection established.
lets see 0
0
Database connection terminated

Please suggest me what I am missing?

share|improve this question
    
Hmm .. just a minute .. –  sridhara Jun 14 '12 at 12:05
    
Maybe id isn't a String ? Try rs.getInt("id") or some such. –  sridhara Jun 14 '12 at 12:12
    
no luck.. :-( infact, System.out.println("lets see " + rs.getFetchSize()); returnign 0 –  piyush Jun 14 '12 at 12:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Most probably it's because you're closing Statement before you are using it's ResultSet. It's strange that it doesn't throw an exception, but this is not correct anyway.

As per Statement.close method JavaDoc:

When a Statement object is closed, its current ResultSet object, if one exists, is also closed.

I suggest to use some kind of callback to retrieve results from ResultSet before it's closed e.g.:

public <T> T query(String sql, IResultSetHandler<T> resultSetHandler ) throws SQLException {
    Statement statement = null;
    try {
        statement = connection.createStatement();
        final ResultSet rs = connection.executeQuery(sql);
        final T result = resultSetHandler.handle(rs);
        return result;
    } finally {
        if(statement != null) {
            statement.close();
        }
    }
}

public interface IResultSetHandler<T> {
    T handle(ResultSet rs);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    JDBCConnect jdbcConn = new JDBCConnect();
    List<String> ids = jdbcConn.query(sql, new IResultSetHandler<List<String>>() {
        public List<String> handle(ResultSet rs) {
            List<String> ids = new ArrayList<String>();
            while(rs.next()) {
                ids.add(rs.getString("id"));
            }
            return ids;
        }
    });
}

Or to use commons apache dbutils library which does exactly the same.

share|improve this answer
    
i am using s.close() in finally, even if i remove that the result is the same. –  piyush Jun 14 '12 at 12:39
    
Edited my answer, please check –  Yura Jun 14 '12 at 12:44
    
Agreed - as you close the statement before returning the resultset, you won't ever have anything in the result set, and as as per the other answer, it is perfectly reasonble for getFetchSize to return 0 even if you matched hundreds of rows. –  Woody Jun 14 '12 at 12:59
    
yeah, it's working perfectly fine. But out of curiosity, why the simplest piece of code was not working? I mean, the rs.next() was not going in the while loop. –  piyush Jun 14 '12 at 13:04
    
Don't know either ... Personally I've never used statement.executeQuery and then statement.getResultSet(). I used it like the following: ResultSet rs = statement.executeQuery(...), maybe that's the problem, though it's strange –  Yura Jun 14 '12 at 13:09

ResultSet.getFetchSize() lets you know the maximum number of rows that the connection will fetch at once. You can set it with ResultSet.setFetchSize(int). See also the official documentation. It does not tell you how many rows in total you will get. If the fetch size is left to zero, JDBC decides on its own.

Other than that, refer to Yura's answer which addresses the core of your problem.

share|improve this answer

Could it be because you never call InsertRows, as it never shows that 'X rows were inserted'

share|improve this answer
    
tables were not created through jdbc. –  piyush Jun 14 '12 at 12:53

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