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I am using gcc version 4.3.3 on my Ubuntu (i686). I have written a stripped down test program to describe my lack of understanding and my problem. The program shall tell me the size of the struct, which I implemented. So I have a typedef struct for a Message and a little main to play around:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct {
    int size; 
    enum {token=0x123456}; 
} Message;

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    Message m;
    m.size = 30;
    printf("sizeof(int): %d\n",sizeof(int));
    printf("sizeof(0x123456): %d\n",sizeof(0x123456));
    printf("sizeof(Message): %d\n",sizeof(Message));
    printf("sizeof(m): %d\n",sizeof(m));
}

While compiling this source with gcc I get the following warning, which I don't understand:

$ gcc sizeof.c
sizeof.c:5: warning: declaration does not declare anything

Line 5 refers to the enum line. I want that token in every Message, that I create. What am I doing wrong? What do I have to change to get rid of that warning?

My main contains several calls of sizeof(). When I run the program, you can see in the output that the integer has the size of four, the hex number has the size of 4, but the typedef struct Message has the size of 4, too:

$ ./a.out
sizeof(int): 4
sizeof(0x123456): 4
sizeof(Message): 4
sizeof(m): 4

That is very confusing to me. Why has Message the size of 4, although it contains an integer and an integer within an enum, each with the size of 4. If the sizeof(Message) would be at least 8, it would be logical to me.

But why is it only 4? How do I get the real size in Bytes of my Message? Or is this really the real size? If so, why?

Is there a difference in getting the size of a Message between C and C++?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are not declaring anything with:

enum {token=0x123456};

Your declaration is similar to:

typedef struct {
    int size; 
    int; 
} Message;

If you declare your struct like this:

typedef struct {
    int size; 
    enum {token=0x123456} e; 
} Message;

There will be two fields, but e will not be initialized to anything. You need to set it manually for every instance: message.e=token.

The correct way to achieve what you want is, to use constructors in C++:

struct Message {
    int size; 
    int token;
    Message() : token(0x123456) {}; 
};

Or non-static data member initializers in C++11:

struct Message {
    int size; 
    int token=0x123456;
};

There is no way to initialize field in struct declaration in C.

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If I am going to use the correct way while using constructors in C++, like your example. How do I determine the size of the struct Message? sizeof(Message) or sizeof(m) each return 4 instead of int+int=4+4=8. –  Strubbl Jun 14 '12 at 16:16
    
Okay, found my mistake. Sorry for the noise. –  Strubbl Jun 14 '12 at 16:27

An enumeration doesn't actually need any space, it's just a way for the compiler to recognize a set of literal numbers by a name.

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Okay, but how can I imagine how the program manages the enum in memory? –  Strubbl Jun 14 '12 at 12:17
3  
@Strubbl: Not. It's not represented in memory because it's not needed. –  MSalters Jun 14 '12 at 12:18

Line 5 does not declare any variable that is of type enum. So the compiler does the only thing it can do: ignore it.

If you want to create a member of that type in the struct, write something like

enum  {token=0x123456} thetoken;

But be aware that this field can only have one valid value, is that what you want?

Edit:
Oh, and to answer your other question: I can't see a difference in output when compiling as C or C++. But there is a difference between how how you should write struct definitions.

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Yes, I only what to have on valid value. I thought such an enum is the only way to keep a constant value within a struct. –  Strubbl Jun 14 '12 at 12:16
    
But if you want it to be a constant, why not simply declare it as a constant? Do you want all your structs to carry this value around that can't change and of which you know what it is, so you never even have to access it? –  Mr Lister Jun 14 '12 at 12:21
    
Can you point me to the difference how I should write struct definitions? (As I am going to use a similar struct in a C++ program) –  Strubbl Jun 14 '12 at 12:21
    
I will access it to check if it is correctly transferred. Obviously I can't put an initializer inside a typedef declaration. So there is no chance to get a const into a struct. Or am I wrong? –  Strubbl Jun 14 '12 at 12:25
1  
@Strubbl in C++, you don't need the typedef. Good answers here. –  Mr Lister Jun 14 '12 at 12:35
typedef struct {
    int size; 
    enum YouShouldDeclareAName {token=0x123456}; 
} Message;

your enum is a subclass/subtype of your Message struct, therefore bounds to Class and not object. Like a namespace. You do not create any variable with it. Change it to:

typedef struct {
    int size; 
    enum YouShouldDeclareAName {token=0x123456} token; 

    //or
    YouShouldDeclareAName token2;
} Message;
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You've defined a constant Message::token that's shared between all objects. Since it's shared, it doesn't count towards the size of a single object.

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As the others answers note, you've declared an enumerated type, you just happened to do it inside a structure instead of at global scope. There's nothing to store, so it uses no memory.

Now if you were to declare an instance of your enumeration in that structure...

typedef struct {
    int size; 
    enum {token=0x123456} e; 
} Message;

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    Message m;
    m.size = 30;
    printf("sizeof(m): %d\n",sizeof(m));
}

sizeof(m): 8
Press any key to continue . . .
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LINE 5:

enum {token=0x123456};

This line doesn't define any enum variable, its a declaration, because of this your compiler complains about line 5 saying its only a declaration.

proper usage should be:

enum {xyz=5}  enum_variable_name;

Only then the compiler will allocate space for this.

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Just like class, function, enum, static menber doesn't store in the object space!

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