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i'm doin' left join in linq to sql, so my question is while selecting the right table fields, i'm checking each field wheather the joined object is null or not, is this the correct way ? or is there any other way to do it ? my query is like

from u in user
join x in employeee on u.id equals x.userId
      into ux from ujoinx in ux.DefaultIfEmpty()
join y in department on x.id equals y.employeeId 
      into xy from xjoiny in xy.DefaultIfEmpty()
select new {
    EmployeeSal = ujoinx!=null?ujoinx.employeeSal:0, // see checkig for null
    EmployeeTax = ujoinx!=null?ujoinx.employeeTax:0, // in this 3 lines
    UserName = u.username,
    DeptName = xjoiny!=null?xjoiny.name:""          //is this a correct way ?
}

The query resulting the answer properly but if i dont check those few fields for null its throwing object reference not set.....error. Here what is that DefaultIfEmpty() doin exactly ??

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you have done is correct.

From msdn, DefaultIfEmpty returns:

An IEnumerable<T> object that contains the default value for the TSource type if source is empty; otherwise, source.

In other words, when the collection is empty, it will return the default value for T. The default value for reference types is null - this is why you must check for null when you select DeptName.

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thank you, actually i have a quite large number of fields, for each field have to check for null im feeling kinda dirty programming, so thought is there any other way to do it.. –  Meson Jun 14 '12 at 13:02

DefaultIfEmpty in this case gives you a null object on the left side of the evaulation. Thus trying to call ujoinx.employeeSal would return object reference no set because ujoinx is null.

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