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I am currently doing my graduate studies with focus on data analysis/informatics in research context and develop utility tools for global research community, with an overwhelming majority of my intended users being rather computer-newbies. In other words, most of my users wouldn't bother (or be able to) gather necessary dependencies and put them in their classpaths. In order to avoid people ignoring my software I have been distributing it as a "fat-jar" with all dependencies contained in one executable file.

I have been reading a bit about software licensing, and realized that it might be legally tricky to do so without paying quite a bit of attention to individual licenses of libraries. I've gone through a number of questions here on StackOverflow (a thorough collection below) but ended up getting more and more confused. Please note that I am fully aware that there are many other questions about software licensing however not in the context of self-contained packages, I have listed many great questions below which provide a bit of the puzzle but not a straight-forward answer in my scenario.

I would greatly appreciate if developers who are more experienced/well-read on the matter could shed some light to the matter by confirming or denying the statements below. I think it could be useful for people who are not programmers but profession but are getting more and more into programming. My understanding is:

  • As long as you do not re-distribute your dependencies, it doesn't really matter what licenses they have, compared with what license you choose for your own project. [Unfortunately going this way would also mean that I would alienate/intimidate a significant portion of my userbase]

  • If you are re-distributing all your dependencies then your project license should be compatible with your dependencies. [Thus I as a developer have to know details of licenses for each dependency??]

  • GPL is the most strict open source license out there (from the common ones), thus if I use a library under GPL license, my own project has to be under GPL as well, which could in theory be contradicting with the license of some other dependency.

  • Assuming my project is under GPL, the fact that the project is non-commercial doesn't matter, it also has to be open source. [This is rather tricky in my situation as algorithms and computational methods need to be "novel" to be published]

Have I misunderstood or simply missed something important or is this a good summary of the situation? Given my situation, do I have other options that I might not have mentioned here/thought of, for instance would it be possible to avoid issues regarding licenses for my dependencies?


References:

Should I be concerned with large number of dependencies?

Which licences are compatible with each other?

Where can I find an authoritative overview of open source licences?

How do you choose an open-source license?

Searching for non-commercial license for source code

Is it legal way to get use GPL code in close-source application through plugin?

How do I tell if I can re-use a 'free' software library in a commercial app? [closed]

Correctly Applying an Open Source License (in particular this answer by @Michael Aaron Safyan)

How do I find the open source license that is right for my project?

How to use an Open Source License

How do you choose an open-source license?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by JasonMArcher, Jeffrey Bosboom, Deduplicator, Nija, HaveNoDisplayName Jun 12 '15 at 0:16

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about licensing or legal issues, not programming or software development. See here and here for details, and the help center for more. – JasonMArcher Jun 11 '15 at 20:12
up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

As long as you do not re-distribute your dependencies, it doesn't really matter what licenses they have, compared with what license you choose for your own project.

Yea, that is true ... for open source dependencies with mainstream licenses. But:

  • It forces your users to download all of the dependencies which is a bad idea.
  • For proprietary dependencies (and open source dependencies with "crazy" licenses) it is possible that the license forbids this, or makes it hard(-er) for your users by forbidding them from doing things.

If you are re-distributing all your dependencies then your project license should be compatible with your dependencies.

Yes. But that is not usually hard. There places to go to find out what licenses are compatible with what others; e.g. the FSF's GPL pages.

[Thus I as a developer have to know details of licenses for each dependency??]

Yes. But you can simplify this by only using dependencies with licenses that are safe. (And most open source licenses are.)

GPL is the most strict open source license out there (from the common ones), thus if I use a library under GPL license, my own project has to be under GPL as well ...

Yes. However, note there is a big difference between GPL and LGPL. LGPL does not have this restriction.

... which could in theory be contradicting with the license of some other dependency.

In theory yes. In practice, GPL allows use of libraries with most other open source licenses. The only problems would be if the other library's license required something that the GPL forbids; i.e. like placing extra conditions on downstream users, packagers, etc.

Assuming my project is under GPL, the fact that the project is non-commercial doesn't matter, it also has to be open source.

That is correct.

[This is rather tricky in my situation as algorithms and computational methods need to be "novel" to be published]

I think you are making a big issue out of something that shouldn't be an issue at all:

  • If you are worried about other people stealing your ideas before you publish, hold off distributing your code until you have published. This is plain common sense ... and not a licensing issue.

  • I don't think that an editor / reviewer would reject your work for publication if the algorithms and methods are embodied in your previously distributed software. Your publication just has to be novel with respect to the publication media ...

... would it be possible to avoid issues regarding licenses for my dependencies?

  • You could write all of your own code from ground up, or hire someone else to do it for you. (Not realistic)

  • You could use commercial software for all of your dependencies, and pay for the right to redistribute.

  • You could contact the copyright holders of your dependencies, and negotiate an alternative license agreement. (That assumes that they are contactable, and willing to negotiate.)

But you can't ignore the issue.

The bottom line is that you are getting something for free when you build your code with open source dependencies, but the quid pro quo is that you have to play by the rules in return. If you don't like the rules, find a different way that doesn't involve open source.

share|improve this answer
    
Another way of avoiding license issues: don't distribute your software :) – Alex Oct 1 '12 at 16:10
    
@Alex - that is true for sensible open source licenses. However, you can get into trouble with a proprietary vendor license without distributing; e.g. think per-user license models. – Stephen C Oct 1 '12 at 16:13
    
@StephenC thanks for a very thorough reply, although I sensed some bitterness in the end there, perhaps it's just me being paranoid. :) – posdef Oct 2 '12 at 6:01
    
@posdef - not bitterness. Rather impatience with people (and companies) who somehow think it is unfair that GPL expects them to reciprocate. – Stephen C Oct 2 '12 at 7:07
    
@StephenC ok just to make it very clear; I have no such opinion of the matter. It's mostly so that I am confused with all the legal stuff and as an engineer/researcher, and not a professional developer, I can't help but feel that these things are "essentially a pain and a waste of my time". Now that being said, I realize that it's unfair to think so, since I cannot just blatantly disrespect the people who took numerous hours of their time to write libraries and graciously put it out there for the public. I just need to learn more about the licences concept and thereby the question above :) – posdef Oct 2 '12 at 7:44

The biggest issue is if you are dealing with software that is not using any of the common open source licenses. Simply put, if these licenses forbid the redistribution of their software, that pretty much stops the debate cold right there.

You can package your software in such a way that if the users get an appropriate license themselves, then you can make it easy for the users to incorporate their licensed libraries in to your system (by updating your class path appropriately, perhaps copying the files to a known place, etc.). Combined with good documentation or automated scripts, this can make installing your software with these libraries less of a burden on your users.

If you using solely open source licensed software, things are much simpler.

The GPL is, as you said, the most strict, but most of the OSS licenses out there are compatible with GPLv3. Apache, BSD, MIT, MPL, X11/MIT.

And, yes, you do need to understand all of the licenses, especially with the GPL. If practical and you can avoid the GPL, all of these issues pretty much go away. As noted earlier, the LGPL is much less strict than the GPL, and many libraries that do go this path choose the LGPL for that reason, but there are some that use the pure GPL instead.

The beauty is nowadays the OSS community is pretty mature, even if still a bit fragmented on licensing, but still really interoperable. Most folks don't even ask these questions and go on their merry way, yet still manage to stay of trouble.

But, boiled down to 3 concepts:

  • If you're using a proprietary library, your options are quite limited in terms of distribution.

  • If you're using a GPL library, you should GPL your software as well.

  • If none of the above, simply don't worry about it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply! – posdef Oct 2 '12 at 6:06
    
"... simply don't worry about it." - I would urge a bit more caution than that. Stick with mainstream OSS licenses that have been thoroughly analysed by legal experts, and given "the big tick". With non-mainstream licenses, it is possible that there is something tricky / nasty in the conditions that only an International Copyright Law expert would be able to spot. (And in this context, the legal uncertainty of licenses drafted by non-experts can in theory be nasty ... in the hands of a nasty lawyer.) – Stephen C Oct 2 '12 at 7:22

Licensing is important but if you make open source, non-commercial software that is not in direct competition with commercial software, the risk that someone will ever complain about your potential misuse of one of the librairies license is very close to zero (and such a complain would not go very far in courts, though your mileage may vary depending on your country of 'origin').

So, do not worry too much and stick to the spirit of the game:

  • if you use commercial librairies, get the license (a lot of them actually have free redistributable licenses for open source projects)

  • if you use GPL librairies, make your project GPL (which is what you are doing anyway)

share|improve this answer

I think you got it right regarding your four points.

One thing that is possible even when your project uses dependencies that contradict each other regarding redistribution is that you do not distribute your program but instead offer it (or the parts using the dependencies in question) as a (web-) service hosted on your own server. Then you can use almost all dependencies you want and even do not have to open source anything. But be aware that some licenses (mostly commercial ones) may restrict server usage.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean JWS deployment? – posdef Jun 14 '12 at 13:36
    
It does not matter if you deploy your service using SOAP webservice/REST/(Servlets/JSP) or any other proprietary protocol using TCP-Sockets. But if your dependencies are downloaded to the client (is this the case in JWS?) then I think this counts as redistribution. What I am talking of is that your application logic is actually executed on your server. – Gandalf Jun 14 '12 at 13:40
    
The dependencies are downloaded to the client at runtime when deploying with JWS. I guess the difference in that scenario, as opposed to a "fatjar", is that you do not put your dependencies under the same roof as your own application. I don't know if that makes a legal difference however. – posdef Jun 14 '12 at 13:47
    
In do not think it makes a difference if the libraries are redistributed by your app on a flash device/cd/at runtime. – Gandalf Jun 14 '12 at 14:06

Sorry but this doesn't have a solution if you use proprietary libraries.

If you use free proprietary libraries you can't include on your software in any way "unless you have an agreement with the author", the client have to download them from the author's web page or repository otherwise you'd be redistributing the library and incurring in copyright violation.

There are several similar cases, recently Java's Oracle in Linux..


The GPL problem:

A possible solution for your algorithms, might be to put it in a separate library without any dependency and add it to your main "GPL" project, this is what most companies use to do.

share|improve this answer
    
Oracle is a bad example. 1) It wasn't about open source licenses. Rather it was mostly about patents, and a legally "novel" idea that APIs could be copyrighted ... despite precedent to the contrary. 2) So far, Oracle has LOST ... though they are appealing of course. – Stephen C Oct 2 '12 at 7:12
    
Besides, Oracle's code is not "free proprietary". It is for the most part GPL ... which made the lawsuit even more absurd. – Stephen C Oct 2 '12 at 7:16
    
Java API vs Android API, which I think you are talking about is about patents and it isn't what I'm referring to. If you follow my link there is clearly explained. Java under the hood uses sun's propietary libraries (now Oracle), there is OpenJDK a project to solve this an make a totally open source implemetattion of java (by default in many linux distros). When a software is for the most part opensource is not totally and you cant redistribute it. – Marlon Jerez Isla Oct 2 '12 at 7:57
    
@MarlonJerezIsla I recall the article from when I was looking for more information regarding the packaging problems between Oracle and Ubuntu Foundation (which messed up sun-jdk for most, if not all, Ubuntu based distros). As a relatively content Mint user I was pretty frustrated. Even though I approve and like the OpenJDK concept, I still feel that it's miles behind the Sun-JDK with respect to all the other tools that comes with it e.g. JVisualVM – posdef Oct 2 '12 at 8:17
    
@MarlonJerezIsla - I see what you are talking about now. Even so, you are painting it too black and white. The situation depends critically on what rights the "free proprietary" license grants to end users and distributors. In the Oracle vs Canonical situation, we don't know what the real agenda is, but my guess it was caused by Oracle demanding money from Canonical for the right to redistribute ... just like they tried to do with Google over Android. In the long term, it is probably a losing strategy. – Stephen C Oct 2 '12 at 14:54

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