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This is a very hard to explain question and I hope my code extract explains most of it.

Let's say you have the following database design: musicstyle relations

And you want to build one generic interface to modify the musicstyle relations between all three entities. Currently I have created a MusicStyleController which requires the type of Entity it is related to (Member, Event or Band).

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public JsonResult DeleteMusicStyle(int id, string type, int typeid)
{
    if (!(Session["MemberLoggedIn"] is Member)) return Json(string.Empty);
    Member member = (Member)Session["MemberLoggedIn"];

    switch (type) { 
        case "member":
            _memberService.DeleteMusicStyle(member, id);
            break;
        case "band":
            Band band = _bandService.GetBand(typeid);
            _bandService.DeleteMusicStyle(band, id);
            break;
        case "event":
            Event @event = _eventService.GetEvent(typeid);
            _bandService.DeleteMusicStyle(@event, id);
            break;
    }
    return SelectedMusicStyles();
}

I make myself sick writing such code, but can't find another, more elegant way.

Note that this function is called using jquery.post().

The question

How would you refactor this code, and would you normalize the database even more? Keep in mind that I'm using the Entity Framework as a data model.

share|improve this question
    
What do you hope to gain from normalizing the database? What volume of data are you expecting (I.E., tens of millions of rows?) –  Kane Jul 9 '09 at 12:12
    
@Kane I'm striving for a best practice in this case, I don't know what that is yet. The database as is provides smooth integration with the Entity Framework and makes it easy to code, if I normalize it even more, say create a MusicStyleCollection table which Band, Event and Member would link to would make things harder to code. And it would be a performancehit if the table grows exceptionally large (which it probably will). –  Peter Jul 9 '09 at 19:37
    
I just added it as a suggestion because there might be a way of normalizing the db in a way I haven't thought of yet. I don't consider myself an allknowing developer, I never can be either... –  Peter Jul 9 '09 at 19:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming that id represents the member's id, you could create 3 separate functions to handle each type, thus separating your concerns more than they are now.

Example:

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public JsonResult DeleteMusicStyleByMember(int id)
{
    if (!(Session["MemberLoggedIn"] is Member)) return Json(string.Empty);
    Member member = (Member)Session["MemberLoggedIn"];
    _memberService.DeleteMusicStyle(member, id);
    return SelectedMusicStyles();
}

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public JsonResult DeleteMusicStyleByBand(int id, int typeid)
{        
    Band band = _bandService.GetBand(typeid);
    _bandService.DeleteMusicStyle(band, id);
    return SelectedMusicStyles();
}

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public JsonResult DeleteMusicStyleByEvent
    (int id, int typeid)
{
    Event event = _eventService.GetEvent(typeid);
    _bandService.DeleteMusicStyle(event, id);
    return SelectedMusicStyles();
}

Then you would just modify your jquery post to go to the respective methods depending on what you're trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
I have thought of this but it would duplicate code even more which I'm trying to avoid. It does sound like an attractive solution and if there is no other logical way I am deffinitely doing it this way. –  Peter Jul 9 '09 at 12:37
    
@Peter I'm not sure how this duplicates code, except perhaps having to have multiple method declarations. Aside from that, each method has their own behavior, even in this example. If you find that methods share certain behaviors after the fact then you can refactor again at that point and consolidate that particular behavior. –  Joseph Jul 9 '09 at 13:06
    
@Joseph I must say I have to agree with you. This probably is the best solution. I'll just have to hold my js responsible for knowing which action to call. –  Peter Jul 9 '09 at 19:33

How would you refactor this code?

1) The code which checks the user is logged in should be moved:

 if (!(Session["MemberLoggedIn"] is Member)) return Json(string.Empty);
    Member member = (Member)Session["MemberLoggedIn"];

This is a cross cutting concern, which should be applied using a security framework, Spring pops to mind as an example.

2) I would avoid using a singleton pattern to represent this use-cases, they can quickly turn into a collection of scripts which when grow large can be difficult to know where to place code. Consider using the Command Pattern instead.

This pattern will allow you to return the results as JSON, XML or any other format based on the interfaces you which your command to conform too.

class DeleteMusicStyleByBandCommand : JsonResultModelCommand, XmlResultModelCommand {

  public DeleteMusicStyleByBand(int id, int typeid) {
     //set private members
  }

  public void execute() {
    ..
  }

  public JsonResult getJsonResult() { .. }

  public XmlResult getXmlResult() { .. }
}

The Command pattern IMHO is much better at representing use-cases than many methods in a Service..

share|improve this answer
    
great idea! This will allow for good code separation. I'm going to implement this and see where I end up. –  Peter Jul 9 '09 at 12:41
    
while implementing this I realised that I still have to create action methods in my controller to call these commands resulting in more code. In the end this would not improve readability nor maintainability. These functions (e.g. deletebandmusicstyle) are called from ajax. –  Peter Jul 9 '09 at 19:30
    
You are a 100% correct on using a security framework though, I just didn't get time to go through the pro's and con's of the different frameworks out there in combination with asp.net mvc –  Peter Jul 9 '09 at 19:31

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