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I am trying to work out why I can not access the nested function in a similar way as I can when I am just accessing an un-nested function (maybe there is a better way to explain this.

In other words, this works:

<html>
<head>
<title>Working with elements</title>
</head>

<script type="text/javascript">
var my_div = null;
var newDiv = null;

function addElement()
{
  // create a new div element
  // and give it some content
  newDiv = document.createElement("div");
  newContent = document.createTextNode("Hi there and greetings!");
  newDiv.appendChild(newContent); //add the text node to the newly created div.

  // add the newly created element and it's content into the DOM
  my_div = document.getElementById("org_div1");
  document.body.insertBefore(newDiv, my_div);
}

</script>

<body onload="addElement()">
<div id='org_div1'> The text above has been created dynamically.</div>
</body>
</html>

This does not work:

<html>
<head>
<title>Working with elements</title>
</head>

<script type="text/javascript">
var my_div = null;
var newDiv = null;

function addElement()
{
    this.getFieldset = function() {
        // create a new div element
        // and give it some content
        newDiv = document.createElement("div");
        newContent = document.createTextNode("Hi there and greetings!");
        newDiv.appendChild(newContent); //add the text node to the newly created div.

        // add the newly created element and it's content into the DOM
        my_div = document.getElementById("org_div1");
        document.body.insertBefore(newDiv, my_div);
    }
}

</script>

<body onload="addElement.getFieldSet()">
<div id='org_div1'> The text above has been created dynamically.</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
In the second case, you never call addElement, so the code inside of it is never executed. But if you would call it, this does not refer to the function itself. this is determined by how you call the function. Learn more here. In your case, addElement does not seem to have to be a function, you could define it as an object instead. –  Felix Kling Jun 14 '12 at 13:34
    
In the second case (new addElement).getFieldSet() will do the trick. –  adamse Jun 14 '12 at 13:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's because you never executed addElement() in the second case in order to execute the this.getFieldset = ... assignment.

You could change your code to

function addElement() {}

addElement.getFieldSet = function() {
        // create a new div element
        // and give it some content
        newDiv = document.createElement("div");
        newContent = document.createTextNode("Hi there and greetings!");
        newDiv.appendChild(newContent); //add the text node to the newly created div.

        // add the newly created element and it's content into the DOM
        my_div = document.getElementById("org_div1");
        document.body.insertBefore(newDiv, my_div);
    };

EDIT

See example at this fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
When I changed this over it does not work, I am getting: TypeError: 'undefined' is not a function (evaluating 'addElement.getFieldSet()') –  fakeguybrushthreepwood Jun 14 '12 at 13:37
    
@peteskiii Sorry, I just copied a typo from your example. In the definition you wrote getFieldset, while in the onload you make a call to getFieldSet. Edited in my answer. –  Sirko Jun 14 '12 at 13:48

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