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Here's the generic class I'm working with:

 public interface IRepository<T> where T : EntityObject
{
    RepositoryInstructionResult Add(T item);
    RepositoryInstructionResult Update(T item);
    RepositoryInstructionResult Delete(T item);
}
public class Repository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : EntityObject
{

    RepositoryInstructionResult Add(T item)
    { //implementation}
    RepositoryInstructionResult Update(T item);
    { //implementation}
    RepositoryInstructionResult Delete(T item);
    { //implementation}
 }

Now I'm looking to occasionally alter the behavior of the methods when t : a specific type. Is something like the following possible? This particular attempt gives an error (Error 5: Partial declarations of 'Repository' must have the same type parameter names in the same order).

public class Repository<Bar> //where Bar : EntityObject
{
    RepositoryInstructionResult Add(Bar item)
    { //different implementation to Repository<T>.Add() }
    //other methods inherit from Repository<T>
 }
share|improve this question
2  
BarRepository : Repository<Bar> ..., and mark the augmentible methods as virtual/override in the base/child classes, respectively. – Anthony Pegram Jun 14 '12 at 13:40
    
@Anthony: Why not post that as an answer? (Which I was about to post =P) – benjer3 Jun 14 '12 at 13:42
up vote 4 down vote accepted
public class BarRepository : Repository<Bar>
{ 
    RepositoryInstructionResult Add(Bar item) 
    { //different implementation to Repository<T>.Add() } 
    //other methods inherit from Repository<T> 
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
My objection to this solution is that you need to instanciate new BarRepository() explicitly. If you call new Repository<Bar>(), you get the generic (ie wrong) implementation. Since Repositories are already being created and consumed accross my codebase, I'd rather not have to hide the instanciation in a factory. – daveharnett Jun 14 '12 at 14:10
    
This code would obviously need methods to be exposed as public in order to fulfill the interface and need virtual/override modifiers in the base/child in order to use the behaviors polymorphically. – Anthony Pegram Jun 14 '12 at 14:17
    
@daveharnett, to best use the repository pattern, the code or logic that is depending upon the repository would be coding to the interface instead of the implementation. That code, then, would be looking at IRepository<Bar>, and thus would not need to change. Although you are correct, any code in charge of creating the concrete implementations would need to be updated. – Anthony Pegram Jun 14 '12 at 14:18
    
@daveharnett Short of littering Repository<T> with hardcoded type checks in the methods you wish to 'override' I'm not sure there's another way around it. A repository factory is the correct way to handle this situation and the rest of the code should only ever care about IRepository<T>, giving you the flexability to modify your implementations by type at will. – roken Jun 14 '12 at 14:20
    
@Anthony Unless somebody swoops in with a magic solution, this is looking like the way to go. Fortunately there are only 3/4 areas of code handling creation (a sort of lazy instanciation pattern), so if I point them at a factory the change shouldn't be too painful. Thanks folks! – daveharnett Jun 14 '12 at 14:33

Name your Repository class RepositoryBase and make interface methods virtual. implement them in e general way inside your RepositoryBase class, but because u marked methods as virtual u will be able to override functionality in your derived classes your code will look something like this.

 public interface IRepository<T> where T : EntityObject
 {
    RepositoryInstructionResult Add(T item);
    RepositoryInstructionResult Update(T item);
    RepositoryInstructionResult Delete(T item);
 }

 public class Repository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : EntityObject
 {
    virtual RepositoryInstructionResult Add(T item)
    { //implementation}
    virtual RepositoryInstructionResult Update(T item);
    { //implementation}
    virtual RepositoryInstructionResult Delete(T item);
    { //implementation}
  }

If U Need some custom logic to be executed for update method for Bar Object simply create derived class Name it BarRepository and override update method of the Repositorybase class here u can either call base implementation or just process with its' own logic

 public class BarRepository : Repositorybase<Bar>
 {
    public override RepositoryInstructionResult Update(Bar item);
    {
       //Call base method if needed
       //Base.Update(item);

       //implement your custom logic here
    }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Ditto my reply to roken. It will get the job done, but it will make consumption more difficult. – daveharnett Jun 14 '12 at 14:19
    
What do u mean by that? – Rati_Ge Jun 14 '12 at 15:48
    
I meant that you need to instanciate new BarRepository() explicitly. If you call new Repository<Bar>(), you get the generic (ie wrong) implementation. Ideally I was looking for a solution that would be hidden from the repository creation code. – daveharnett Jun 15 '12 at 10:33
    
u do not have to do this manually u could bring in same naming convention so that those repositories can be created automatically. U would have to write this instantiation logic once using Cativator.CreateInstance. there are lots of ways to achieve what to try to do, but this conversation could turn in to huge framework development so I am leaving decisions up to u – Rati_Ge Jun 15 '12 at 11:06

As a direct answer to your question: The closest possible thing to what you've shown is checking the actual value of T at runtime. In your add method, you can write something like this:

if (typeof(T) == typeof(Bar)) {
    // your Bar-specific code
}
// ...

Note that this may not be very good in terms of performance, in particular if you have more than one or two such special types that you want to treat differently.

Other than that, the only solution is a subclass that specifies the actual type argument for the base class, as outlined in the other answers.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Performance aside, this would be very messy if there are more than a few special cases. – daveharnett Jun 14 '12 at 14:27
    
@daveharnett: Not necessarily; in that case, you might want to use a Dictionary<Type, Handler> of Handler objects (a class of your own) that execute type-specific actions. Like this, it's basically just three to four lines of code (possibly less with an extension method) in each method that needs special treatment. – O. R. Mapper Jun 14 '12 at 14:32

use an extension method :

public static void DoSomething(this repository<Bar> repo)
{
  //your custom code goes here
}
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