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Apple.h

class Apple {
public:
    Apple(int);
    static int typeID;
private:
    int id_;
};

Apple.cpp

#include "Apple.h"
Apple::Apple(int pID) {
    id_ = pID;
}

Potato.h, Potato.cpp identical to Apple

Storage.h

#pragma once
#include "Apple.h"
#include "Potato.h"
#include <vector>
class Storage {
public:
    Storage();
    template<typename foodName> void store(foodName * object){
        (*getBasket<foodName>()).push_back(object);
    };
    template<typename foodName> int countSize(){
        return (*getBasket<foodName>()).size();
    };

private:
    std::vector<Apple*> applebasket_;
    std::vector<Potato*> potatobasket_;
    template <typename foodName> std::vector<foodName*> * getBasket(){
        std::vector<foodName*> * result;
        switch(foodName::typeID){
            case 0:
                result = &applebasket_;
                break;
            case 1:
                //result = &potatobasket_;
                break;
        }
        return result;
    } 
};

Storage.cpp

#include "Storage.h"
int Apple::typeID;
int Potato::typeID;
Storage::Storage() {
    Apple::typeID = 0;
    Potato::typeID =1;
}

main.cpp

#include "Storage.h"
#include <iostream>
int main() {
    Apple* apple;
    Potato* potato;
    Storage storage;
    int i;
    for(i = 0;i < 7;i++){
        apple = new Apple(i);
        storage.store<Apple>(apple);  
    }      
    std::cout<<storage.countSize<Apple>();
    return 0;
}

This code works and outputs right size of vector, but if case line in switch statement (inside Storage.h) is uncommented, compiler(g++) throws "error: cannot convert ‘std::vector < Potato*>* ' to 'std::vector< Apple*>* ' in assignment". It is like compiler trying out both cases anyway, and i cant find is it possible and how to avoid this. I need help with this and maybe some advice on a whole thing(one interface for containers of different types), I've started learning C++ recently and probably the way i try this to do here is a total mess.

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2  
You certainly should not set the typeID in the Storage constructor. But +1 for an interesting question. –  larsmans Jun 14 '12 at 14:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code doesn't compile because both case should compile which is not possible, as the type differs in both case.

One solution to this problem is to use overload instead of function template as (which means, there is NO need of typeID in your class!) :

std::vector<Apple*> * get_basket(Apple *)
{
   return &applebasket_;  //return pointer to the apple basket
}

std::vector<Potato*> * get_basket(Potato *)
{
   return &potatobasket_; //return pointer to the potate basket
}

And call it as:

template<typename FoodType> 
void store(FoodType * object)
{
    std::vector<FoodType> * basket = get_basket(static_cast<FoodType*>(0));
    basket->push_back(object);
}

The trick here is that you have two overloads, each takes one argument of different type, and so you use static_cast<FoodType*>(0) to help the compiler to pick the correct overload based on the type of the expression static_cast<FoodType*>(0) which would be either of type Apple* or Potato*.


@Gorpik said in the comment that both (this as well as other solution) are ugly, so here is another attempt to solve this problem.

Define a base_storage class template as:

template<typename FoodType>
class base_storage
{
    std::vector<FoodType*> m_storage;
    public:
        void store(FoodType *foodItem)
        {
            m_storage.push_back(foodItem);
        }
        size_t count() const
        {
            return m_storage.size();
        }
};

This base class stores food items of one type only, but in the question, we need to store food items of two types. So in order to do that, lets define another class Storage deriving from the above class template as:

class storage : private base_storage<Apple>, private base_storage<Potato>
{
    public:
        template<typename FoodType> 
        void store(FoodType * foodItem)
        {
            base_storage<FoodType>::store(foodItem);
        }
        template<typename FoodType> 
        size_t count() const
        {
            return base_storage<FoodType>::count();
        }
};

Note two points here:

  • The class storage doesn't have any member data now. It just forward the call to the base class which is chosen based on the type of template argument FoodType.
  • It derives privately from the base classes. So it is not is-a relationship.

See the online demo of this solution here : http://ideone.com/Ykjo5

The beauty of this solution is that if you want to make it work for three types of food, then all you need to derive it from three base classes as:

class storage : private base_storage<Apple>, 
                private base_storage<Potato>,
                private base_storage<Mango>   //added line!
{

     //same as before; no change at all !

};

Demo : http://ideone.com/lnMds

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1  
This works, Thanks! –  Человек Ящерица Jun 14 '12 at 14:42
    
@Человек Ящерица: See the alternative solution. –  Nawaz Jun 14 '12 at 15:34
1  
I think this is an elegant way. I'll use it. –  Человек Ящерица Jun 14 '12 at 19:40

std::vector<Apple *> and std::vector<Potato *> are different types. C++ templates produce a complete copy of the class definition and all its code at compile time, so there's no relationship between the resultant concrete types at all.

If Apple and Potato shared a common parent class, say Food you could store both kinds of thing in a std::vector<Food *>, but you still wouldn't be able to return a std::vector<Apple *> where a std::vector<Food *> was expected.

Your getBasket() method attempts to get around this by templating the return type, but it can't because templates are evaluated at compile time while the switch statement is evaluated at run time. The compiler has to decide what the foodStuff parameter is before the program even begins to run, and so it has no idea what the outcome of that switch statement might be. Yet it has to make a decision anyway, and it's gone for the result it can derive from the first return statement it finds in the function body, with the unfortunate consequence that the second one is then invalid.

So, you need to either store and retrieve Apples and Potatos separately (possibly using templating as some of the other answers have suggested), or use inheritance so that you can store them in something which understands a common parent type.

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You don't need even to use typeID field. Let compiler to do all job.

class Storage {
public:
    Storage();
    template<typename foodName> void store(foodName * object){
        (*getBasket<foodName>()).push_back(object);
    };
    template<typename foodName> int countSize(){
        return (*getBasket<foodName>()).size();
    };

private:
    std::vector<Apple*> applebasket_;
    std::vector<Potato*> potatobasket_;

    template <typename foodName> std::vector<foodName*> * getBasket();
};


template <> std::vector<Apple*> * Storage::getBasket()
{
    return &applebasket_;
} 
template <> std::vector<Potato*> * Storage::getBasket()
{
    return &potatobasket_;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
please remove the ; at the end of getBacket() specializations. –  PermanentGuest Jun 14 '12 at 14:26
    
thanks. removed them –  inkooboo Jun 14 '12 at 14:27
    
    
It gives me "explicit specialization in non-namespace scope ‘class Storage’" on two lines with getBasket() , already found thread about this error check this out later. –  Человек Ящерица Jun 14 '12 at 14:47
    
@Nawaz: I agree with you, but the alternative you propose is quite ugly on the caller side. Neither solution satisfies me completely, though I don't see better alternatives. –  Gorpik Jun 14 '12 at 14:51

Specialize getBasket for the two cases.

Or better, don't mix abstration levels this way, and just provide separate potato and apple containers.

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