Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say you had a fairly basic client/server code, where each client creates three threads and multiple clients can connect at once. I want the server to wait for an incoming connection, and once it starts getting connections, to run until there are no more threads running, then exit. Code is similar to below. (ie, rather than the server "serve forever," I want it to exit once all the threads finish).

edit: I want the server to wait for incoming connections. Once the connections begin, it should keep accepting connections until there are no threads left running, then exit. These connections will be somewhat sporadic.

import socket
import threading

# Our thread class:
class ClientThread ( threading.Thread ):

   # Override Thread's __init__ method to accept the parameters needed:
   def __init__ ( self, channel, details ):

      self.channel = channel
      self.details = details
      threading.Thread.__init__ ( self )

   def run ( self ):

      print 'Received connection:', self.details [ 0 ]
      self.channel.send ( 'hello from server' )
      for x in xrange ( 10 ):
         print self.channel.recv ( 1024 )
      self.channel.close()
      print 'Closed connection:', self.details [ 0 ]

# Set up the server:
server = socket.socket ( socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM )
server.bind ( ( '', 2727 ) )
server.listen ( 5 )

# Have the server serve "forever":
while True:
   channel, details = server.accept()
   ClientThread ( channel, details ).start()
share|improve this question
    
If the server is serving forever, how is it supposed to know how many connections it should expect before deciding to shutdown? If 3 connections come in right away, and then nothing for a bit, the server might start waiting for that 3. But a forth may come in. Are you saying from the moment the first connection comes in, you want the server to detect the instant when no more client threads are alive and shutdown? It is always waiting for a 100% idle moment to die? –  jdi Jun 14 '12 at 15:11
    
yes, exactly, once it is idle it can die, but before that it should wait until the first connection or two comes in. –  Cameron Sparr Jun 14 '12 at 15:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As per your comments, what you are looking for is to starting counting connections after the first one is made to the server, and to kill the server once there are no more existing connections.

An immediate problem with your current infinite while loop is that is blocks on each accept(). So no matter what, it will always be waiting for another connection. You would have to interrupt it from some other thread to get it out of that loop. But another solution would be to make your event loop larger, and the act of accepting a new connection is only one part of it. The loop should also be checking for a condition to exit.

This example is only one possible way. It makes use of a Queue.Queue to coordinate the work counter.

import socket
import threading
import select
from Queue import Queue

class ClientThread ( threading.Thread ):

   def __init__ ( self, channel, details, queue=None ):
      self.channel = channel
      self.details = details
      self.queue = queue
      threading.Thread.__init__ ( self )

   def run ( self ):

      if self.queue:
         self.queue.put(1)

      print 'Received connection:', self.details [ 0 ]
      self.channel.send ( 'hello from server' )
      for x in xrange ( 10 ):
         print self.channel.recv ( 1024 )
      self.channel.close()
      print 'Closed connection:', self.details [ 0 ]

      if self.queue:
         self.queue.get_nowait()

# Set up the server:
server = socket.socket ( socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM )
server.bind ( ( '', 2727 ) )
server.listen ( 5 )

rlist = [server]
work_queue = Queue()

def accept_client():
   channel, details = server.accept()
   ClientThread ( channel, details, work_queue ).start() 

accept_client()

while not work_queue.empty():
   server_ready, _, _ = select.select(rlist,[],[], .25)
   if server in server_ready:
      accept_client()

print "Shutting down"
server.close()
print "Exiting"

We use select.select as a simple way to detect activity on your server socket, but also with a timeout. If the server is ready, then we accept the new connection. If it reaches the .25 second timeout, we just loop again and wait.

You will see that we create a queue and constantly check if its empty. The queue is passed into each thread. When a thread is started, it logs some work into the queue. The data is arbitrary. Just a flag. When the thread has completed, it will clear that item from the queue. The result is that after the first connection is received, the queue is no longer empty, and the loop will keep running. If at any point the queue becomes empty (because all current threads have finished), the loop will break and the server will shut down.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, thank you! Looks like I have some work to do, I had a feeling I should be making use of the select and queue modules but I wasn't sure where to begin. –  Cameron Sparr Jun 14 '12 at 18:24
    
@COpython: Ya, well like I said, this is just one way to do it. You could accomplish this in ways that don't use a queue. select.select is pretty portable, so that helps as well. –  jdi Jun 14 '12 at 18:29

If you break from the while loop, the process will wait until all the ClientThreads exit, and will then terminate.

This will work because the client threads are non-daemon. See threading.Thread.daemon for further details on this.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm, tried this, but then it breaks after finishing the first client that connects. ie, this would only work if all threads connected at exactly the same time. –  Cameron Sparr Jun 14 '12 at 14:50
    
@COpython: This means that there was only a single client thread when the main loop stopped. I think you need to clarify your requirements around when exactly you want the process to stop. –  NPE Jun 14 '12 at 14:51
    
I believe you are thinking that the server will break after it receives connection(s), what I am looking for is for it to exit after the threads FINISH. –  Cameron Sparr Jun 14 '12 at 15:00
    
@COpython: No, the process will not exit until all (non-daemon) threads finish. –  NPE Jun 14 '12 at 15:12
    
but it's doing each thread concurrently, so let's say thread A and B connect, then A finishes, breaking the loop, then thread C wants to connect before B finishes. The behavior I'm getting is that thread C can't connect because A already broke the loop..? –  Cameron Sparr Jun 14 '12 at 15:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.