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I have a javascript object, which I've added a number of prototyped functions to, which mostly depend in some way on the members of the object.

myForm() {
    this.property1 = "Prop1";
    this.property2 = "Prop2";
}

myForm.prototype.loadValues = function(){ /*...*/);

myForm.prototype.setValues = function(){ /*...*/);

myForm.prototype.doStuff = function(){ /*...*/);

There are enough functions/code that it is currently sitting at ~4 thousand lines, and it is driving me nuts every time I have to debug it using dev tools/firebug. I was thinking of splitting this up as such.

myForm.js -

myForm(){
    this.property1 = "Prop1";
    this.property2 = "Prop2";
    new myFormLoadActions();
    new myFormSetActions();
    new myFormDoStuffActions();
}

myFormLoadActions.js

myFormLoadActions(){
    myForm.prototype.loadValues = function(){ /*...*/);
}

myFormSetActions.js

myFormSetActions(){
    myForm.prototype.setValues = function(){ /*...*/);
}

myFormDoStuffActions.js

myFormDoStuffActions(){
    myForm.prototype.doStuff = function(){ /*...*/);
}

I've trialled this, and it seems to work functionally. Is this a reccomended way of dealing with a large number of prototyped functions, or is there a better way?

share|improve this question
    
That doesn't make any sense. The real problem is that your class is doing too much. – Esailija Jun 14 '12 at 14:43
    
You're right, it is doing far too much. Given time, I'd love to refactor it into smaller pieces. This is supposed to be an intirim soloution so don't get so frustrated when trying to debug a 4k line javascript file. – John Jun 14 '12 at 14:51
1  
In that case you can simply split it into smaller files without doing anything. You can modify prototype from multiple files just like that. File 1 can have myForm.prototype.doStuff = file 2 can have myForm.prototype.setValues = and so on to make a super simplified example – Esailija Jun 14 '12 at 14:53
    
Yes, that exactly what I was trying to do. I guess this is what happens when you try and do something with you don't fully grasp. – John Jun 14 '12 at 15:13
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Keep your old code, but simply scatter assignments to prototype over multiple files:

File 0

myForm() {
    this.property1 = "Prop1";
    this.property2 = "Prop2";
}

File 1

myForm.prototype.loadValues = function(){ /*...*/);

File 2

myForm.prototype.setValues = function(){ /*...*/);

As I noted in the comments, this is just a problem of one class doing too much but you realize that and just want smaller files, so here you go :)

share|improve this answer

To me, that looks a bit strange. I mean, you're constructing objects for their 'side-effects' (adding properties to a different object's prototype), and then throwing them away immediately:

myForm(){
    ...
    new myFormLoadActions();
    ...
}

The object that you've "newed up" doesn't actually do anything after instantiation, and you're not holding a reference to its instance, so it would be better just to be a callable function:

myForm(){
    ...
    myFormLoadActions(this);
    ...
}

That's just my humble opinion though, feel free to argue!

share|improve this answer

I would recommend this approach coz it seems more neat to me and also not difficult to debug.

myForm() {
    this.property1 = "Prop1";
    this.property2 = "Prop2";
}

myForm.prototype = {
    loadValues: function(){ /*...*/),
    setValues: function(){ /*...*/),
    doStuff: function(){ /*...*/),
    .
    .
    .
}

Another approach:

myForm(){
    this.property1 = "Prop1";
    this.property2 = "Prop2";
    addFunctionsToPrototype();
}
addFunctionsToPrototype(){
    myForm.prototype.loadValues = function(){ /*...*/);
    myForm.prototype.setValues = function(){ /*...*/);
    myForm.prototype.doStuff = function(){ /*...*/);
}
share|improve this answer

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