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I am trying to sample a subset from data with replacement and here I show a simple example as follows:

dat <- data.frame (
  group = c(1,1,2,2,2,3,3,4,4,4,4,5,5), 
  var = c(0.1,0.0,0.3,0.4,0.8,0.5,0.2,0.3,0.7,0.9,0.2,0.4,0.6)
) 

I just want to sample a subset based on the group numbers. If the group, e.g., group = 1, is selected, the whole group (two group members in my simple example above) will be selected. If the group was selected more than one times, the group number will be changed as a new group, e.g., 1.1, 1.1, 1.2, 1.2, …. The new data may look like this:

newdat <- data.frame (
  group = c(3,3,5,5,3.1,3.1,1,1,3.2,3.2,5.1,5.1,3.3,3.3,2,2,2), 
  var = c(0.5,0.2,0.4,0.6,0.5,0.2,0.1,0.0,0.5,0.2,0.4,0.6,0.5,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.8)
) 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
I take it you mean sample with replacement? How many samples should there be for each original group? –  Sean Jun 14 '12 at 15:21
    
Sorry I didn't say the total sample size (groups) in the new data, say 20. For each original group, it can be selected any times (randomly). –  user187454 Jun 14 '12 at 15:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a fairly simple solution that uses make.unique() to create the names of the groups in newdat:

## Your data
dat <- data.frame (
  group = c(1,1,2,2,2,3,3,4,4,4,4,5,5), 
  var = c(0.1,0.0,0.3,0.4,0.8,0.5,0.2,0.3,0.7,0.9,0.2,0.4,0.6)
) 
n <- c(3,5,3,1,3,2,5,3,2)

## Make a 'look-up' data frame that associates sampled groups with new names,
## then use merge to create `newdat`
df <- data.frame(group = n, 
                 newgroup = as.numeric(make.unique(as.character(n))))
newdat <- merge(df, dat)[-1]
names(newdat)[1] <- "group"
share|improve this answer
    
Yes. It is very simple and no problem with the new group numbers. Than you very much. –  user187454 Jun 14 '12 at 16:27
    
make.unique! Who knew. Thanks for a fun new function :-) –  Ari B. Friedman Jun 14 '12 at 18:12
    
@gsk3 -- No problem. Both it and make.names have come in handy for me from time-to-time (sometimes in surprising settings). –  Josh O'Brien Jun 14 '12 at 21:00

Pick your n however you prefer:

n <- 5 

Then run this (or make a function out of it):

lvls <- unique(dat$group)
gp.orig <- gp.samp <- sample( lvls, n, replace=TRUE ) #this is the actual sampling
library(taRifx)
res <- stack.list(lapply( gp.samp, function(i) dat[dat$group==i,] ))
# Now make your pretty group names
while(any(duplicated(gp.samp))) {
  gp.samp[duplicated(gp.samp)] <- gp.samp[duplicated(gp.samp)] + .1
}
# Replace group with pretty group names (a simple merge doesn't work here because the groups are not unique)
gp.df <- as.data.frame(table(dat$group))
names(gp.df) <- c("group","n")
gp.samp.df <- merge(data.frame(group=gp.orig,pretty=gp.samp,order=seq(length(gp.orig))), gp.df )
gp.samp.df <- sort(gp.samp.df, f=~order)
res$pretty <- with( gp.samp.df, rep(pretty,n))

   group var pretty
6      3 0.5    3.0
7      3 0.2    3.0
12     5 0.4    5.0
13     5 0.6    5.0
61     3 0.5    3.1
71     3 0.2    3.1
62     3 0.5    3.2
72     3 0.2    3.2
3      2 0.3    2.0
4      2 0.4    2.0
5      2 0.8    2.0

Should be pretty general. If you want more than 10 groups, you'll have to use text-based methods to calculate the "pretty" version, as this will wrap over since it's numerically-based. E.g. the 11th group 3 will be calculated as 3+10*.1=4 !

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for library(taRifx) –  Sean Jun 14 '12 at 15:32
    
Ha! Thanks Sean. –  Ari B. Friedman Jun 14 '12 at 15:35
    
Thank you so much. Your code works great. –  user187454 Jun 14 '12 at 15:40
    
Hi, You recommended using some text-based methods to calculate the "pretty" version. Since I am working on a huge dataset, it is not convenient to do it. Do you have any other suggestions or idea to solve this issue automatically? Thanks. –  user187454 Jun 14 '12 at 16:12
    
make.unique appears to do this nicely. See @JoshOBrien's answer. –  Ari B. Friedman Jun 14 '12 at 18:13

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