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I've been wondering how I could check all my parameters efficiently in any function in a clean and concise way. I've come up with :

function fooBar($myArg, $mySecondArg, $myOptionnalArg = "defaultValue"){
    if(!isset($myArg, $mySecondArg, $myOptionnalArg){
        die(__FUNCTION__ . ":missing parameter");
    }

    if(empty($myArg, $mySecondArg, $myOptionnalArg){
        die(__FUNCTION__ . ":empty parameter");
    }
    //Do stuff
}

What I'm looking for is more like:

function fooBar($myArg, $mySecondArg, $myOptionnalArg = "defaultValue"){
    $argArray = func_get_args();
    foreach($argArray as $a){
        if(empty($a)){
            die(__FUNCTION__.":".get_arg_name($a)."is empty");
        }        
        if(!isset($a)){
            die(__FUNCTION__.":".get_arg_name($a)."is unset");
        }    
    }
    //Do stuff
}

Wich doesn't work since get_arg_name(); is pure fiction, and func_get_args(); returns the actual parameters, rather than the ones defined in the prototype.

Could someone give me a hint about it? Any other good/clean way to achieve that is also welcome. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Don't you think you should ensure that arguments are valid before you invoke the function with the mentioned arguments? A function should do as little work as possible, keeping the code clean and decoupled as much as possible. As soon as you want to check whether the arguments fit some scheme (whether they're empty or not set etc.), from within the function.. something smells bad. You can type hint the arguments to make your functions more type-aware, but check the variables before calling the function, not after. –  N.B. Jun 14 '12 at 15:36
    
@NB, validating preconditions is pretty common, at least in the "outer crust functions". –  goat Jun 14 '12 at 15:43
    
Dunnow if my habits are bad or not. But I'm used to function that crash if they don't get the parameters they expect. Writing sum("a string","anotherstring"); should not be possible in my opinion. I'm looking for a way to avoid that. –  monsieur_h Jun 14 '12 at 15:46
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With reflection only. Some example:

function test($a, $b, $c) {
  $function = new ReflectionFunction(__FUNCTION__);
  $parameters = $function->getParameters();

  print_r($parameters);
}

test(0, 1, 2);

You will see something like this:

Array
(
    [0] => ReflectionParameter Object
        (
            [name] => a
        )

    [1] => ReflectionParameter Object
        (
            [name] => b
        )

    [2] => ReflectionParameter Object
        (
            [name] => c
        )

)
share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I was looking for. But as far as I read, performance is worth mentionning. –  monsieur_h Jun 15 '12 at 7:47
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Its possible to get what you need with using php reflection:

http://php.net/manual/en/book.reflection.php

Please, read more about how to use it.

share|improve this answer
    
This is correct, although I'll add that reflection is kinda slow. I feel the performance is worth mentioning because someone may adopt the usage of such code in many of their php functions. –  goat Jun 14 '12 at 15:40
    
You can do the reflection only if you have any errors, but not all the time!, so there will be no performance issues about it. Just do it properly. –  Anton Jun 14 '12 at 15:41
    
Incorrect. An error doesn't always result from invalid arguments. –  goat Jun 14 '12 at 15:45
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