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I have the method Process(IEnumerable<Record> records) which can take UP TO but NO MORE THAN 3 records at a time. I have hundreds of records, so I need to pass in groups. I do this:

var _Records = Enumerable.Range(1, 16).ToArray();
for (int i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i += 3)
{
    var _ShortList = _Records.Skip(i).Take(3);
    if (!_ShortList.Any())
        break;
    Process(_ShortList);
}
// TODO: finish

It works, but... is there a better way?

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2  
There is always a better way than break inside of a loop... –  gdoron Jun 14 '12 at 15:43
2  
You can change your for for a while with your breaking condition inside. It will be shorter and cleaner. –  Mualig Jun 14 '12 at 15:46
    
@Mualig. The obvious answer... +1 –  gdoron Jun 14 '12 at 15:47
    
This is very inefficient - you have 2 calls to Skip (and Take) per every iteration of the loop. One in Any and one in Process (due to the deferred execution). Since each Skip iterates over roughly N/2 elements on average, the whole thing is O(N^2). –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jun 14 '12 at 16:45

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may use this extension method:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Split<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int chunkSize)
{
    return source
        .Select((value, i) => new { Index = i, Value = value })
        .GroupBy(item => item.Index % chunkSize)
        .Select(chunk => chunk.Select(item => item.Value));
}

It splits a source collection of items into several chunks with given size. So your code will look next:

foreach (var chunk in Enumerable.Range(1, 16).Split(3))
{
    Process(chunk);
}
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1  
Really brilliant. Thank you. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 14 '12 at 20:15
    
Bonus - it works in WinRT! –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 14 '12 at 20:16

you can use MoreLinq's Batch

var result=Enumerable.Range(1, 16).Batch(3);

or

var arrayOfArrays = Enumerable.Range(1, 16).Batch(3).Select(x => x.ToArray()).ToArray();

And here is the source if you want to take a look at it.

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Here's another LINQ-y way to do it:

var batchSize = 3;
Enumerable.Range(0, (_Records.Length - 1)/batchSize + 1)
    .ToList()
    .ForEach(i => Process(_Records.Skip(i * batchSize).Take(batchSize)));
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, you really simplified it. ;) –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 14 '12 at 16:21
    
If you're not into the whole, you know, clarity thing. ;) –  Japple Jun 14 '12 at 16:24

In case you need "pagination" multiple times in your solution, you may consider using an extension method.

Hacked one together in LINQPad, it will do the trick.

public static class MyExtensions {
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Paginate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int pageSize) {
        T[] buffer = new T[pageSize];
        int index = 0;

        foreach (var item in source) {
            buffer[index++] = item;

            if (index >= pageSize) {
                yield return buffer.Take(pageSize);
                index = 0;
            }
        }

        if (index > 0) {
            yield return buffer.Take(index);
        }
    }
}

Basically, it pre-fills a buffer of size pageSize and yields it just when it's full. If there are < pageSize elements left, we yield them as well. So,

Enumerable.Range(1, 10).Paginate(3).Dump(); // Dump is a LINQPad extension

will yield

{{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9}, {10}}
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You can create your own extension method:

static class Extensions {

  public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> ToBlocks<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int blockSize) {
    var count = 0;
    T[] block = null;
    foreach (var item in source) {
      if (block == null)
        block = new T[blockSize];
      block[count++] = item;
      if (count == blockSize) {
        yield return block;
        block = null;
        count = 0;
      }
    }
    if (count > 0)
      yield return block.Take(count);
  }

}
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public static void ChunkProcess<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int size, Action<IEnumerable<T>> action)
{
    var chunk = source.Take(size);

    while (chunk.Any())
    {
        action(chunk);

        source = source.Skip(size);
        chunk = source.Take(size);
    }
}

and your code would be

ChunkProcess(_Records, 3, Process);
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var _Records = Enumerable.Range(1, 16).ToArray();

int index = 0;
foreach (var group in _Records.GroupBy(element => index++ / 3))
    Process(group);

NOTE: The code above is short and relatively efficient, but is still not as efficient as it can be (it will essentially build a hashtable behind the scenes). A slightly more cumbersome, but faster way would be:

var _Records = Enumerable.Range(1, 16).ToArray();

var buff = new int[3];
int index = 0;

foreach (var element in _Records) {
    if (index == buff.Length) {
        Process(buff);
        index = 0;
    }
    buff[index++] = element;
}

if (index > 0)
    Process(buff.Take(index));

Or, pack it to a more reusable form:

public static class EnumerableEx {

    public static void Paginate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> elements, int page_size, Action<IEnumerable<T>> process_page) {

        var buff = new T[3];
        int index = 0;
        foreach (var element in elements) {
            if (index == buff.Length) {
                process_page(buff);
                index = 0;
            }
            buff[index++] = element;
        }

        if (index > 0)
            process_page(buff.Take(index));

    }

}

// ...

var _Records = Enumerable.Range(1, 16).ToArray();
_Records.Paginate(3, Process);
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