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The first program compiled properly.second gave error saying too few argument for foo... is global declaration ignored by the compiler in both programs?

first program:

#include<stdio.h>
    void foo();
int main()
{
  void foo(int);
  foo(1);
  return 0;
}

void foo(int i)
{
   printf("2 ");
}

void f()
{
   foo(1);
}

second program:

void foo();
int main()
{
  void foo(int);
  foo();
  return 0;
}

void foo()
{
   printf("2 ");
}

void f()
{
   foo();
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The inner declaration hides declarations at the global scope. The second program fails because the declaration void foo(int); hides the global declaration void foo();; so when you say foo within main you are referring to the one taking an int as argument.

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but i want to know how inner declarations work? does compiler just ignore global always? as in f() function if it calls foo() why does it not consider global declaration? –  vindhya Jun 14 '12 at 15:56
    
@user1315833: An inner declaration always hides an outer declaration of the same name, so the compiler cannot even see the outer declaration (as its hidden). –  K-ballo Jun 14 '12 at 15:57
    
:ok......got it.Thanks a lot for quick response.. –  vindhya Jun 14 '12 at 15:59

I see that you investigate the specific behavior of inner declaration but why not:

#include<stdio.h>

void foo(int);

int main()
{
    foo(1);
    return 0;
}

void foo(int i)
{
   printf("2 ");
}

void f()
{
   foo(1);
}

or even:

#include<stdio.h>

void foo(int i)
{
   printf("2 ");
}

void f()
{
   foo(1);
}

int main()
{
    foo(1);
    return 0;
}
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