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I have this code:

class LFSeq: # lazy infinite sequence with new elements from func
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.evaluated = []
        self.func = func
    class __iter__:
        def __init__(self, seq):
            self.index = 0
            self.seq = seq
        def next(self):
            if self.index >= len(self.seq.evaluated):
                self.seq.evaluated += [self.seq.func()]
            self.index += 1
            return self.seq.evaluated[self.index - 1]

And I explicitely want that LFSeq.__iter__ becomes bounded to an instance of LFSeq like any other user-defined function would have been.

It doesn't work this way though because only user-defined functions are bounded and not classes.

When I introduce a function decorator like

def bound(f):
    def dummy(*args, **kwargs):
        return f(*args, **kwargs)
    return dummy

then I can decorate __iter__ by it and it works:

...
@bound
class __iter__:
    ...

This feels somehow hacky and inconsistent however. Is there any other way? Should it be that way?

I guess yes because otherwise LFSeq.__iter__ and LFSeq(None).__iter__ wouldn't be the same object anymore (i.e. the class object). Maybe the whole thing about bounded functions should have been syntactic sugar instead of having it in the runtime. But then, on the other side, syntactic sugar shouldn't really dependent on content. I guess there has to be some tradeoff at some place.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The easiest solution for what you are trying to do is to define your __iter__() method as a generator function:

class LFSeq(object):
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.evaluated = []
        self.func = func
    def __iter__(self):
        index = 0
        while True:
            if index == len(self.evaluated):
                self.evaluated.append(self.func())
            yield self.evaluated[index]
            index += 1

Your approach would have to deal with lots of subtleties of the Python object model, and there's no reason to go that route.

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In my opinion, the best solution is @Sven one, no doubt about it. That said, what you are trying to do really seems extremely hackish - I mean, to define __iter__ as a class. It will not work because declaring a class inside another one is not like defining a method, but instead it is like defining an attribute. The code

class LFSeq:
    class __iter__:

roughly equivalent to an attribution that will create a class field:

class LFSeq:
     __iter__ = type('__iter__', (), ...)

Then, every time you define an attribute inside a class, this is bound to the class itself, not to specific instances.

I think you should follow @Sven solution, but if you really want to define a class for any other reason, it seems you are lucky, because your generator class does not depend upon nothing from the LFSeq instance itself. Just define the iterator class outside:

class Iterator(object):
    def __init__(self, seq):
        self.index = 0
        self.seq = seq
    def next(self):
        if self.index >= len(self.seq.evaluated):
            self.seq.evaluated += [self.seq.func()]
        self.index += 1
        return self.seq.evaluated[self.index - 1]

and instantiate it inside LFSeq.__iter__() method:

class LFSeq(object): # lazy infinite sequence with new elements from func
    def __init__(self, func):
        self.evaluated = []
        self.func = func
    def __iter__(self):
        return Iterator(self)

If you eventually need to bind the iterator class to the instance, you can define the iterator class inside LFSeq.__init__(), put it on a self attribute and instantiate it in LFSeq.__iter__():

class LFSeq(object): # lazy infinite sequence with new elements from func
    def __init__(self, func):

        lfseq_self = self # For using inside the iterator class

        class Iterator(object): # Iterator class defined inside __init__
            def __init__(self):
                self.index = 0
                self.seq = lfseq_self # using the outside self
            def next(self):
                if self.index >= len(self.seq.evaluated):
                    self.seq.evaluated += [self.seq.func()]
                self.index += 1
                return self.seq.evaluated[self.index - 1]

        self.iterator_class = Iterator # setting the itrator
        self.evaluated = []
        self.func = func

    def __iter__(self):
        return self.iterator_class() # Creating an iterator

As I have said, however, @Sven solution seems finer. I just answered do try to explain why your code did not behaved as you expected and to provide some info about to do what you want to do - which may be useful sometimes nonetheless.

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