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I'm new at java graphic design, and I would like you, if possible, to help me with an easy example to help me to get to understand the basic functionallity of JFrames, Timers, SwingControllers, and all this stuff. How would you implement the following case:

We have a JFrame with a JPanel inside. When the execution starts, the JPanel is white, but we want it to change it's colour every two seconds:

public class MiJFrame extends javax.swing.JFrame {

    public MiJFrame() {
        initComponents();
    }


    public static void main(String args[]) {
        java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            public void run() {
                new MiJFrame().setVisible(true);
                jPanel1.setBackground(Color.yellow);
                jPanel1.setBackground(Color.RED);
            }
        });
    }

    // Variables declaration - do not modify
    private static javax.swing.JPanel jPanel1;
    // End of variables declaration
}

At first, I used the sleep method of a thread object between the setBackgroud() methods but it doesn't work, as it only shows the last change.How would you use here a Timer object?

Thank you very much for your help!

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closed as too localized by Boro, Hovercraft Full Of Eels, Anony-Mousse, kapa, Graviton Jun 15 '12 at 9:12

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6  
"How would you use here a Timer object?" If I was at the stage of asking that question, I'd be checking out the How to Use Swing Timers tutorial. –  Andrew Thompson Jun 14 '12 at 15:55
    
extends javax.swing.JFrame Don't extend GUI components if not necessary. Simply keep a reference to the frame (assuming you need a ref. to it). –  Andrew Thompson Jun 14 '12 at 15:57
    
As it goes to setBackground() method it does work you just need to call repaint() after you make the changes. But for this use the Swing's Timer you are right, just read the link @AndrewThompson provided. –  Boro Jun 14 '12 at 15:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

First of all, whenever you need to change the colour of the said thingy, always set Opaque property to true for the said thingy. Like in your case it's the JPanel so first of all you must use panelObject.setOpaque(true), for some Look And Feels calling this method is a must for background colour changes to take effect.

Do try this code example, regarding the rest :

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;
/*
 * @see
 * http://stackoverflow.com/q/11036830/1057230
 */

public class ColourTimer
{
    private JPanel contentPane;
    private Timer timer;
    private int counter;
    private Color[] colours = {
                                Color.RED,
                                Color.WHITE,
                                Color.BLUE,
                                Color.DARK_GRAY,
                                Color.YELLOW,
                                Color.LIGHT_GRAY,
                                Color.BLACK,
                                Color.MAGENTA,
                                Color.PINK,
                                Color.CYAN
                              };

    private ActionListener timerAction = new ActionListener()
    {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae)
        {
            if (counter == (colours.length - 1))
                counter = 0;
            contentPane.setBackground(colours[counter++]);
        }    
    };

    public ColourTimer()
    {
        counter = 0;
    }

    private void displayGUI()
    {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame("Colour Timer");
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);

        contentPane = new JPanel();
        contentPane.setOpaque(true);

        final JButton button = new JButton("STOP");
        button.addActionListener(new ActionListener()
        {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae)
            {
                if (timer.isRunning())
                {
                    button.setText("START");
                    timer.stop();
                }
                else
                {
                    button.setText("STOP");
                    timer.start();
                }
            }
        });

        frame.getContentPane().add(contentPane, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        frame.getContentPane().add(button, BorderLayout.PAGE_END);
        frame.setSize(300, 200);
        frame.setLocationByPlatform(true);
        frame.setVisible(true);
        timer = new Timer(2000, timerAction);
        timer.start();
    }

    public static void main(String... args)
    {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable()
        {
            @Override
            public void run()
            {
                new ColourTimer().displayGUI();
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You are right it it good approach to remember to setOpaque(true) for a 'thingy', but in this case a JPanel has it 'true' by defaultm thus it is not the case here. Other then that nice code sample (+1). To be more picky :) I would change the if (counter == 9) to if (counter >= colours.length) –  Boro Jun 14 '12 at 16:47
1  
@Boro : Thankyou and KEEP SMILING :-), though what you said regarding condition is one better approach then mine, though regarding JPanel having default Opaque property, this might not be right always, have a look at this statement taken from Java Doc which states "Make sure your component is opaque. JPanels, for example, are opaque by default in many but not all look and feels." –  nIcE cOw Jun 14 '12 at 17:03
1  
Good one - well defended. Didn't know that truth about JPanels before. Thanks for teaching me - always happy to learn more. Oi :) –  Boro Jun 14 '12 at 17:08
    
Thank you very much! You really helped me a lot! –  user1454456 Jun 19 '12 at 9:42
    
@user1454456 : You are MOST WELCOME and KEEP SMILING :-) Glad this answer did helped you somewhere :-) –  nIcE cOw Jun 19 '12 at 9:44

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