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I understand I can create an enum like this:

public enum MyEnum {
   ONE(1),
   TWO(2);
   private int value;
   private MyEnum(int value) {
      this.value = value);
   }
   public int getValue() {
      return value;
   }
}

But I have some questions:

1) It seems that the enum values are declared at the start. Is there a particular format for this. Could I declare them anywhere?

2) Is is possible to declare an enum with more than one constructor and is this something that people sometimes do?

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Care to share how you want to use it? –  Juan Mendes Jun 14 '12 at 16:31
1  
I wonder why you just didn't try 2) first? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 14 '12 at 16:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
public enum MyEnum {
   ONE(1),
   TWO(1, 2);
   private int value1, value2;

   private MyEnum(int value) {
      this.value1 = value;
      this.value2 = 0; // default
      // this.value2 = getFromSomewhereElse(); // get it at runtime
   }

   private MyEnum(int value1, int value2) {
      this.value1 = value1;
      this.value2 = value2;
   }

   public int getValue() {
      return value;
   }
}
  1. Yes, you must declare the enum values at the start. Always.
  2. See code above. It is possible. If people do it depends on the application. If you have a lot of fields and most of them should be a default value, it is a good thing to use multiple constructors. Also, the values for the fields could be read at runtime (from a file or another static class).
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  1. Yes, they must be declared before other fields of the enum class.
  2. Yes, they can have more than one constructor.

You could have discovered by trying it yourself.

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I know, how long could it possibly take? However, it's now here for when others search for it. I'm more interested in what cases it would be useful –  Juan Mendes Jun 14 '12 at 16:31
    
An enum is a class. If you have understood why several constructors might be useful for a class, you also have understood why they might be for an enum: for the same reasons. –  JB Nizet Jun 14 '12 at 16:35
    
Enum is a special kind of class. Just showing an example would be a much more useful comment than implying that I don't understand overloading constructors. From your comment I would guess the example would be defaulting some fields, that's the most common use for overloading constructors I know of... –  Juan Mendes Jun 14 '12 at 16:37
    
There are examples already in other answers. I'm sure you understand overloading constructors. What I was not sure is if you knew that enums were classes. They're not so special. They can't inherit another class, and they have a fixed set of instances. Otherwise, they're classes like all the other classes. –  JB Nizet Jun 14 '12 at 16:39
    
I used to use the typesafe enums pattern before java 1.5, but I've never created one with multiple constructors, I'm just curious as to what the real world usage is. –  Juan Mendes Jun 14 '12 at 16:50
  1. According to JLS 7, the constants go first.

  2. "Any constructor or member declarations within an enum declaration apply to the enum type exactly as if they had been present in the class body of a normal class declaration, unless explicitly stated otherwise." and "It is a compile-time error if a constructor declaration of an enum type is public or protected." (ibid., 8.9.2)

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