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I would like to create a class that runs something (a runnable) at regular intervals but that can be awaken when needed. If I could encapsulate the whole thing I would like to expose the following methods:

public class SomeService implements Runnable {


  public run() {
    // the code to run at every interval
  }

  public static void start() { }
  public static void wakeup() { }
  public static void shutdown() { }

}

Somehow I've gotten this far. But I'm not sure if this is the correct approach.

public class SomeService implements Runnable {

  private static SomeService service;
  private static Thread thread;
  static {
    start();
  }

  private boolean running = true;

  private SomeService() {
  }

  public void run() {
    while (running) {
      try {
        // do what needs to be done
        // perhaps peeking at a blocking queue
        // or checking for records in a database
        // trying to be independent of the communication
        System.out.println("what needs to be done");
        // wait for 15 seconds or until notify
        synchronized (thread) {
          try {
            thread.wait(15000);
          } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            System.out.println("interrupted");
          }
        }
      } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
      }
    }
  }

  private static void start() {
    System.out.println("start");
    service = new SomeService();
    thread = new Thread(service);
    thread.setDaemon(true);
    thread.start();
  }

  public static void wakeup() {
    synchronized (thread) {
      thread.notify();
    }
  }

  public static void shutdown() {
    synchronized (thread) {
      service.running = false;
      thread.interrupt();
      try {
        thread.join();
      } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
      }
    }
    System.out.println("shutdown");
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

    SomeService.wakeup();
    System.in.read();
    SomeService.wakeup();
    System.in.read();
    SomeService.shutdown();

  }

}

I'm concerned that the variables should be declared volatile. And also concerned that I should check in the "what needs to be done part" for thread.isInterrupted(). Does this seem like the right approach? Should I translate this to executors? How can I force a run on a scheduled executor?

EDIT

After experimenting with the executor, it seems that this approach seems reasonable. What do you think?

public class SomeExecutorService implements Runnable {

  private static final SomeExecutorService runner 
    = new SomeExecutorService();

  private static final ScheduledExecutorService executor 
    = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();

  // properties

  ScheduledFuture<?> scheduled = null;

  // constructors

  private SomeExecutorService() {
  }

  // methods

  public void schedule(int seconds) {
    scheduled = executor.schedule(runner, seconds, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
  }

  public void force() {
    if (scheduled.cancel(false)) {
      schedule(0);
    }
  }

  public void run() {
    try {
      _logger.trace("doing what is needed");
    } catch (Exception e) {
      _logger.error("unexpected exception", e);
    } finally {
      schedule(DELAY_SECONDS);
    }
  }

  // static methods

  public static void initialize() {
    runner.schedule(0);
  }

  public static void wakeup() {
    runner.force();
  }

  public static void destroy() {
    executor.shutdownNow();
  }

}
share|improve this question
    
making all methods static is a bad practice as I know. Why don't you keep only main() static and iniside create an instance service = new SomeService(); –  alaster Jun 14 '12 at 16:41
    
@alaster I was thinking that this would encapsulate the problem further since I don't need to keep track of the created service. With the static declaration I can just star it using SomeService.wakeup() and finish it with SomeService.shutdown(). Since I can only have one running... it seemed like a good approach. –  rmarimon Jun 14 '12 at 16:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For starters - you probably don't want to implement Runnable yourself; you should take in a Runnable. You should only implement Runnable if you expect your class to be passed to others to execute.

Why not just wrap a ScheduledExecutorService? Here's a quick (very poor, but ought to be functional) implementation.

public class PokeableService {

  private ScheduledExecutorService service = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(1);
  private final Runnable codeToRun;

  public PokeableService (Runnable toRun, long delay, long interval, TimeUnit units) {
    codeToRun = toRun;
    service.scheduleAtFixedRate(toRun, delay, interval, units);
  }

  public void poke () {
    service.execute(codeToRun);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Exactly what I was going to suggest. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jun 14 '12 at 16:51
    
poke() should also remove scheduled task, otherwise scheduled task would execute after poked task in less time interval than prescribed. –  Alexei Kaigorodov Jun 14 '12 at 17:03
    
Does the poke remove the scheduled at fixed rate? Can the execute and scheduled run at the same time? –  rmarimon Jun 14 '12 at 17:07
    
How can I reset the interval after the poke? Say the toRun is scheduled for every 20 seconds. I poke at second 10, next run occurs in 10 seconds but I would like it to happen at 20 seconds after poke. –  rmarimon Jun 14 '12 at 17:21
    
Are the threads used by the Executors set as daemon? Don't want to wait for anything to stop when shutting down the application. –  rmarimon Jun 14 '12 at 17:31

The variables do not need to be volatile since they are read and modified in a synchronized block.

You should use a different object for the lock then the thread, since the Thread class does it's own synchronization.

I would recommend using a single threaded ScheduledExecutorService and remove sleeping. Then if you want to run the task during the current sleep period, you can submit it to the executor again for a single time run. Just use the execute or submit methods in ExecutorService which ScheduledExecutorService extends.

About checking for isInterrupted, you should do this if the do work portion can take a lot of time, can be cancelled in the middle, and is not calling methods that block and will throw an interrupted exception any ways.

share|improve this answer

Using wait/notify should be a more efficient method. I also agree with the suggestion that using 'volatile' is not necessary and synchronizing on an alternative object would be wise to avoid conflicts.

A few other suggestions:

  • Start the thread elsewhere, starting from a static block is not good practice
  • Putting the execute logic in an "execute()" method or similar would be desirable

This code implements the above suggestions. Note also that there is only the one thread performing the SomeService execution logic and that it will occur INTERVAL milliseconds after the time it last completed. You should not get duplicate executions after a manually triggered wakeUp() call.

public class SomeService implements Runnable {

  private static final INTERVAL = 15 * 1000;
  private Object svcSynchronizer = new Object();
  private boolean running = true;

  private SomeService() {
  }

  public void run() {
    while (running) {
      try {
        // do what needs to be done
        // perhaps peeking at a blocking queue
        // or checking for records in a database
        // trying to be independent of the communication
        System.out.println("what needs to be done");

        // wait for 15 seconds or until notify
        try {
          svcSynchronizer.wait(INTERVAL);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
          // ignore interruptions
        }

      } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
      }
    }
  }


  public void wakeUp() {
    svcSynchronizer.notifyAll();
  }

  public void shutdown() {
    running = false;
    svcSynchronizer.notifyAll();
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
how would you handle the shutdown of the whole thing? –  rmarimon Jun 14 '12 at 17:12
    
added an example for the shutdown action, that should cause an exit from the .wait() call and the while(running) loop will quit. –  peterporter Jun 14 '12 at 18:20

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