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Suppose I want to define a method name(:key) using the Ruby Module Mixin metaprogramming spell (creating my own little DSL)

module MyDsl

  def self.included(base)
    base.extend(ClassMethods)
  end

  module ClassMethods
    def mymethod(name)

      # name("key") 
      method_name = "#{name}".to_sym
      define_method(method_name) do |arg|
         # ...
      end

    end
  end

end

How can I define the methods

name[:key]
name[:key]=val
name[:key]+=3
name[:key]++

and so on

What is the syntax for the Ruby define_method(method_name) to allow specifying the [] array / hash access and to set values, increment values, and so on?

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2  
As a note, Ruby does not have a ++ operator. – tadman Jun 14 '12 at 18:17
    
"What is the syntax for the Ruby define_method(method_name)"? Try ri Module#define_method from the command-line. – the Tin Man Jun 14 '12 at 19:19

Your method name must return an object that has the methods [] and []= defined. The += is just a shortcut, and there is no ++ in Ruby.

If you need most of the methods of Hash to be available, either use a Hash or look into subclassing DelegateClass(Hash) or SimpleDelegator

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