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In my UI, when a press a button, the following code is executed:

backgroundWorker1 = new BackgroundWorker();
backgroundWorker1.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
backgroundWorker1.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
backgroundWorker1.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_DoWork);
backgroundWorker1.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged);
backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted);
backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();

This works great the first time. When I hit the button (which then becomes disabled), I can still move the window around and click stuff while the background task is executing. But when the background worker is done (button becomes enabled again) and I press it again, the background worker runs, but I no longer have control of the window.

I have no idea why this doesn't work the second time. Is there something I need to do before or after the background worker runs to make sure it is not blocking the UI thread?

Thanks!

Edit: In the backgroundworker ProgressChanged handler, I update a progress bar and text labels displaying how far along the background worker is. They are constantly updated and never freeze. But when I try and drag the window or click on other controls, they only respond periodically.

The backgroundworker accesses an instance of a class that is a global variable in the UI thread. The idea was to instantiate the object, run a long function the object performs from inside the backgroundworker's DoWork, and then access the object after the backgroundworker has finished to view the results. Is this ok to do?

Inside this object's function that is called in the backgroundworker's DoWork, a couple static classes are accessed. Will this cause any sort of threading issues?

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Call Dispose() on the backgroundWorker when you're finished with it. –  Killercam Jun 14 '12 at 17:56
2  
Also, fix accept rate otherwise the god of code will eat you for dinner... –  Killercam Jun 14 '12 at 17:57
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There doesn’t appear to be anything wrong with your code. Could you paste the event handlers for ProgressChanged and RunWorkerCompleted? –  Douglas Jun 14 '12 at 17:57
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I wonder why are people up-voting this question when there's no clear way to reproduce. –  GregC Jun 14 '12 at 18:07
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In your worker thread are you only interacting with GUI controls via Invoke? That's the only thing that comes to mind that would affect the GUI in this way. Maybe improper GUI control access is getting the worker & GUI thread(s) tangled up? –  Mark M Jun 14 '12 at 18:14
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2 Answers

You can use the BackgroundWorker in two ways.

  1. By dropping it from the toolbox to the form and setting its properties and events in the properties window.

  2. By defining it programmatically.

Probably you mixed both approaches.


If you used the first approach, then drop all the initialization code (the form does it automatically for you!) and call only

backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();

If you want to use the second approach, do not place it on the form. Instead declare it as member variable. The only purpose of being able to add it as a component to the form is to enable setting properties and events through the properties window. The BackgroundWorker does not need anything from the form and can be used completely independently from any form. Then setup the worker in the forms constructor

backgroundWorker1 = new BackgroundWorker();
backgroundWorker1.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true;
backgroundWorker1.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
backgroundWorker1.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_DoWork);
backgroundWorker1.ProgressChanged +=
    new ProgressChangedEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_ProgressChanged);
backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerCompleted +=
    new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted);

and do only this in the button click handler

backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();

The same considerations are true for most or all of the components that you find in the toolbox in the Components section.

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if possible try to use Reactive extensions... its awesome for asynchronous processing.

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