Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

So I'm working on learning PDO, and making the transfer from the standard PHP MySQL functions. However, I have a question. Regarding the try {} blocks, what exactly should be in them, and what should go outside it?

Should everything that uses $sth-> ... be inside try {}? Should it just be from when the statement is first prepared all the way to when it is executed? Even less than that?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. :)

Here is an example method I have in a class. Is it organized properly? Notice how I put everything inside try {}. Is that wrong? It feels incorrect to me, but I'm not sure how I should change it.

protected function authorized()
{
    try
    {
        // Attempt to grab the user from the database.
        $sth = $dbh->prepare("
            SELECT COUNT(*) AS num_rows
            FROM users
            WHERE user_id = :user_id
            ");

        $sth->bindParam(':user_id', $this->user_id);
        $sth->execute();

        // Check if user exists in database.
        if ($sth->fetch()->num_rows > 0)
        {
            // User exists in database, and is therefore valid.
            return TRUE;
        }
        else
        {
            // User does not exist in database, and is therefore invalid.
            return FALSE;
        }
    }
    catch (PDOException $e)
    {
        pdo_error($e);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
I was asking this same question at work the other day! Does everything go or not? –  Drewdin Jun 14 '12 at 19:12
    
Very good question. That subject is something not many developers know –  Madara Uchiha Jun 14 '12 at 19:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The try catch should be outside the function.

<?php

protected function authorized() {
    // Attempt to grab the user from the database.
    $sth = $dbh->prepare("
            SELECT COUNT(*) AS num_rows
            FROM users
            WHERE user_id = :user_id
            ");

    $sth->bindParam(':user_id', $this->user_id);
    $sth->execute();

    // Check if user exists in database.
    if ($sth->fetch()->num_rows > 0) {
        // User exists in database, and is therefore valid.
        return TRUE;
    }
    else {
        // User does not exist in database, and is therefore invalid.
        return FALSE;
    }
}

...

try {
    authorized()
}
catch (PDOException $e) {
    pdo_error($e);
}

Don't handle exceptions inside of the methods. You try the method and catch the resulting exception if it happens.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, okay, that makes sense in this instance. What about when it's not inside a function? In another script I have, I have several nested loops and conditionals, et cetera, and it's several hundred lines long. In that situation, would I wrap the entire code block in a try {}? In other words, should EVERYTHING be inside the try {} always--with "everything" being anything that makes used of $dbh or $sth? –  Nathanael Jun 14 '12 at 19:23
    
What if the method throws something other than a PDOException? –  Mike Jun 14 '12 at 19:24
    
@Mike: You catch an Exception as well, which is the generic type and will catch all exceptions type. You can catch multiple exceptions. –  Madara Uchiha Jun 14 '12 at 19:24
    
@NathanaelShermett: Yes. But in general, all of your business logic, which is most likely to throw exceptions, should be inside of classes and methods. In the off shot where you need to execute code outside of a function and throw exceptions, you should wrap the try/catch over everything. –  Madara Uchiha Jun 14 '12 at 19:27
    
isn't this exactly the same as having no try catch block with proper error modes? try catch should be used to infer different behaviour from a script, not just report errors that would be reported anyway - stackoverflow.com/questions/23571128/… –  Félix Gagnon-Grenier May 21 '14 at 19:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.