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I'm not sure I completely understand hash tables/unordered maps. When I do the following, the code compiles and works properly:

#include <tr1/unordered_map>

int main() {
    tr1::unordered_map<string, int> base;
    string string1;
    int integer1;

    base["A"] = 0;

    string1 = "A";
    integer1 = base[string1];
    cout << integer1 << endl;
    return 0;
}

But this doesn't compile:

#include <tr1/unordered_map>

int main() {
    tr1::unordered_map<int, char> base;
    char char1;
    int integer1;

    base[1] = 'A';

    integer1 = 1;
    char1 = base[integer1];
    cout << char1 << endl;
    return 0;
}

This yields this error:

error: no match for call to '(std::tr1::unordered_map<int, char, std::tr1::hash<int>, s std::equal_to<int>, std::allocator<std::pair<const int, char> >, false>) (int*)'

Could someone explain to me this problem? I don't think I understand how unordered_map works. I'm compiling with gcc 4.2.1 on an Apple.

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4  
The second snippet with a couple of lines' fix compiles just fine with gcc. See this. What compiler are you on? –  dirkgently Jun 14 '12 at 19:19
    
@dirkgently I'm using g++ 4.2.1, maybe I should update? –  Michael LeVine Jun 14 '12 at 19:27
    
That is pretty old considering GCC released 4.7 (with a wonderful C++11 support). It could be a bug in the implementation. So, yes, I guess you will need to upgrade. Also, if you're on Apple, this may be a bit behind actual GCC 4.2.1! –  dirkgently Jun 14 '12 at 19:31
    
@dirkgently I am on an Apple. Is there any problem upgrading past what Apple "supports"? –  Michael LeVine Jun 14 '12 at 19:39
    
I can't really say, I haven't touched Apple in a while. But from what I hear, it should be fairly easy to keep both (the existing and a new one). –  dirkgently Jun 14 '12 at 19:42

1 Answer 1

The following compiles and works fine with both Visual C++ 10.0 and MinGW g++ 4.6.1:

#include <iostream>
#include <unordered_map>

int main()
{
    using std::unordered_map;
    using std::cout;  using std::endl;

    unordered_map<int, char> base;
    char char1;
    int integer1;

    base[1] = 'A';

    integer1 = 1;
    char1 = base[integer1];
    cout << char1 << endl;
    return 0;
}

TR is short for “Technical Report”. TR1 was the first technical report, and contained extensions to the standard library. Those extensions have already been adopted in the C++11 standard, and most have already been implemented in e.g. Visual C++ and g++.

So, just use the standard library directly.

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