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I know what is the problem but I don't really understand why it is happening. Suppose you have this:

HTML:

<div><p>Hello</p><button>Fire</button></div>
<br/>
<button id="menu-button">Menu</button>

JavaScript:

function myObject(container, buttonElement) {
    this.container = container;
}

myObject.prototype.change = function () {
    var box = this.container;
    console.log(box);
    box.find('button').on('click', function() {
        console.log('firing');
        box.find('p').toggle();
    });

};

var obj1 = new myObject($('div'));
$('#menu-button').on('click', function(){
    obj1.change();
});​

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/L24As/1/

As you can see, when you click on the "Menu" button and obj1.change() starts, which adds an event handler to the button "Fire", everything works as expected. However, if you click again on the "Menu" button, you are creating another event, so now toggle() doesn't work because the first event is hiding and second one is showing the paragraph. Why is that? I would have thought that the event should have been overwritten.

I solved it like this:

http://jsfiddle.net/L24As/3/

function myObject(container) {
    this.container = container;
    this.change = function () {
        var box = this.container;
        console.log(box);
        box.find('button').on('click', function() {
            console.log('firing');
            box.find('p').toggle();
        });
    };
}

var obj1 = new myObject($('div'));
obj1.change();

​Is it a good solution? The event is attached to the button "Fire" since the start, so the "Menu" button is used to show other things, which makes them a bit different, although they perform the same task.

share|improve this question
    
Before tinkering with prototypes, it would be helpful to learn the basics, like lexical scope. eloquentjavascript.net –  katspaugh Jun 14 '12 at 19:37
    
By the way, that's not a reason to downvote and the problem wasn't lexical scope. –  Robert Smith Jun 14 '12 at 20:18
    
I didn't say the problem was scope. Having no var just witnesses the absence of systematic learning of the subject. Picking up here and there and making wild guesses won't get you far. Moreover, numerous formatting and spelling errors. –  katspaugh Jun 14 '12 at 20:26
    
You're reading too much between lines. I always use var but in this case, it's not needed. Please, point out formatting or spelling errors (English is not my first language, anyway, so that would be helpful). Still, not a reason to downvote at all. –  Robert Smith Jun 14 '12 at 21:01
1  
Yeah. The strange language of English. No need for more than one punctuation mark in the end of a sentence. ? or ., not both. –  katspaugh Jun 14 '12 at 21:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would have thought that the event should have been overwritten.

No, it wouldn't be overwritten. It's adding them and firing them all (see addEventListener which is behind the on function).

You should add the event once. Your solution is correct.

Here's the essence of the problem (see the comments):

myObject.prototype.change = function () {
    var box = this.container;
    console.log(box);
    box.find('button').on(
        'click',

        // Here you create a new function object.
        // Each time you call the `change` method,
        // it will add another function object as an event handler.
        function () {
            console.log('firing');
            box.find('p').toggle();
        }
    );
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your answer. Reading the documentation you referred to, it says this: "If multiple identical EventListeners are registered on the same EventTarget with the same parameters, the duplicate instances are discarded. They do not cause the EventListener to be called twice, and since the duplicates are discarded, they do not need to be removed manually with the removeEventListener method.". Isn't that what I'm doing?. –  Robert Smith Jun 14 '12 at 19:49
    
Identical means the same object (as in "the same person"), not different objects with the same body (which is the case here). You are creating a different function object on each click on the menu. –  katspaugh Jun 14 '12 at 19:54
    
Uhm. I left the 'new' statement outside of .on('click', function () { }). I thought I was triggering .change() to the same instance obj1. –  Robert Smith Jun 14 '12 at 19:56
    
By the way, you have an extra bracket here: menu.unbind('click', bindObject); });​ I tried to edit it but editions need to have more than 6 characters. –  Robert Smith Jun 14 '12 at 19:57
    
It's not new that creates the event handlers. I'll annotate the code in the answer. –  katspaugh Jun 14 '12 at 20:01

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