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checking for existence of javascript object property with a variable as part of the object name.

var myObj;
myObj.prop = "exists";
var myProp = "p"+"r"+"o"+"p";

if(myObj.myProp){
    alert("yes, i have that property");
};

This is undefined because it's looking for myObj.myProp when i want it to check for myObj.prop

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use myObj[myProp] instead. possible duplicate of javascript object, access variable property name? –  jbabey Jun 14 '12 at 20:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 198 down vote accepted
if(myObj.hasOwnProperty(myProp)){
    alert("yes, i have that property");
}

Or

if(myProp in myObj){
    alert("yes, i have that property");
}
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25  
hasOwnProperty() is preffered if you don't want to check for inherited properties. –  adamse Jun 14 '12 at 21:17
2  
hasOwnProperty() is better then myObj[myProp] (from other answers) as it works even if the value of myProp is 0 –  Matt R Oct 26 '12 at 19:48
2  
The "in" operator does not work with strings. e.g. 'length' in 'qqq' will produce an exception. So if you want a general purpose check you need to use hasOwnProperty. –  Jacob Jun 19 '14 at 17:55
1  
myProp needs to be a string or string variable. –  Chad Kuehn Jul 21 '14 at 14:26
    
@ChadKuehn: Pretty sure myProp can be anything. It should be auto-converted to a string. –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 21 '14 at 18:07

Use the in operator:

if(myProp in myObj){
    // your code
}

or Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty():

if(myObj.hasOwnProperty(myProp)){
    // your code
}

I'll refer you to this answer since it's pretty snazzy.

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if(typeof myObj[myProp] !== "undefined"){... would be inappropriate for a case where myProp is actually assigned undefined. –  Igwe Kalu Aug 5 '14 at 14:55
    
@SultanBaby True (and noted). Though, I'd have to wonder at the intent of assigning undefined to a property. –  canon Aug 5 '14 at 15:21
    
well it's allowed and it's legal to assign undefined, and so that is worth a consideration no matter what. A case that may motivate such strategy is data-binding: you observe/watch a property for change, so the property must exist first before you can observe its changes. –  Igwe Kalu Aug 5 '14 at 15:47
    
@SultanBaby True. –  canon Aug 5 '14 at 17:06

Thank you for everyone's assistance and pushing to get rid of the eval statement. Variables needed to be in brackets, not dot notation. This works and is clean, proper code.

Each of these are variables: appChoice, underI, underObstr.

if(typeof tData.tonicdata[appChoice][underI][underObstr] !== "undefined"){
    //enter code here
}
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what about? !!myObject['myProp'] works for me.

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1  
This does not work if the value is 'falsy' like 0, null or false –  jorgenfb Feb 12 '14 at 8:26
if(myObj[myProp])
{

   `enter code here`

}
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This will throw an exception if the property doesn't exist which is what the OP wanted to avoid. –  HDave Nov 20 '13 at 16:43
    
Just to clarify - this will not throw an exception if the property doesn't exist. However, the if statement would not be satisfied if the property had a falsy value. –  Dejan Lukić Mar 12 at 6:27

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