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If we write this-

var myVariable={
   propertyA:"valueA",
   propertyB:"valueB",
}

We can call propertyB like this-

myVariable.propertyB

Keeping this in mind, when we write-

document.getElementById('myDiv').style.visibility='hidden'

We can write this, like this-

document.getElementById('myDiv').style={
                                   visibility:'hidden',
                                   display:'inline',
                                 }

Well, if that was correct then we may do this-

document.getElementById('myDiv')={
       innerHTML:'this is a div',
       style:{
         visibility:'hidden',
         display:'inline',
       }
}

Now, if those were correct then may be this also-

document={
  getElementById('myDiv'):{
    innerHTML:'this is a div',
    style:{
      visibility:'hidden',
      display:'inline',
    }
  }
  getElementById('mySpan'):{
    innerHTML:'this is a span',
    style:{
      visibility:'visible',
      display:'table',
    }
  }
}

So, how many of them are wrong/correct? If wrong, why and what was wrong? Can you give me any more information related to this?

Thanks in advance :-)

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2  
Id love to answer this, but you really ought to do your own homework. –  Loktar Jun 14 '12 at 20:31
    
don't think that i am taking an advice not asking someone to do something for me. –  In need of Help Jun 14 '12 at 20:33
1  
Start by looking at document.__proto__ and document.getElementById('myDiv').__proto__, and compare that to ({}).__proto__. –  Matt Ball Jun 14 '12 at 20:34
1  
@MattBall explain more clearly i am new to js, and not much intelligent too. –  In need of Help Jun 14 '12 at 20:35

2 Answers 2

All Javascript objects are hashes, and vice versa -- so your assumption is based in truth. However, Javascript assignment is a replacement operation, not augmentation. This can be easily seen in a simple example:

obj = { a: { b: 2 } }
obj.a.b   // => 2
obj.a = { c: 3 }
obj.a.c   // => 3
obj.a.b   // => undefined

Barring magic in the implementation of a HTMLElement's style attribute, assigning to it will not simply merge the values. The further up that chain you assign, the more damage you do.

Finally, any value given before a : in an object literal is expected to be either a string or a bareword (which will be quoted) -- variables and function calls (like getElementById('mySpan')) cannot be used as keys in an object literal.

You can, however, get the behavior you were looking for with something like the following:

var divStyles = document.getElementById('myDiv').style;
var styles = { visibility:'hidden', display:'inline' };

for (key in styles) {
  if (styles.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
    divStyles[key] = styles[key];
  }
}

The overhead may or may not be worth it, depending on how many properties you are changing.

share|improve this answer
    
You gave a good answer but i asked, what is wrong/correct? Are all of them correct they can save a lot of time. –  In need of Help Jun 14 '12 at 20:53
2  
As I explained, none of your object assignments work the way you've described them. –  pvande Jun 14 '12 at 20:55

Whenever you do

myVar.someObject = { ... }

You completely override "someObject", throwing away any poperties it had before the assignment.

var myvar = { obj: {a:1, b:2} };
myvar.obj = {a:3}

console.log(myvar.obj.a) // 3; ok
console.log(myvar.obj.b) // undefined; oh no!
share|improve this answer
    
explain more clearly i am new to js, and not much intelligent too. –  In need of Help Jun 14 '12 at 20:39
1  
missingno: Did you read through the question? –  squint Jun 14 '12 at 20:40
    
as simple as that +1 –  Jashwant Jun 14 '12 at 20:41
1  
Did anyone read through the question? –  squint Jun 14 '12 at 20:41
1  
@amnotiam i think you are right the answer is something different than the question –  In need of Help Jun 14 '12 at 20:43

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