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I'm not new to R but I am new to writing functions in R and attempting to write a function that will repeat a command a set number of times and store the results of each iteration in a vector. In this case I have an ordered vector (I'm calling this a "deck") of size "m" that is shuffled "n" times. Each time the deck is shuffled I want to compare the original deck to the shuffled deck and count the number of times the original deck and shuffled deck have numbers in the same place. If there are any matches at all, store a "1" and if there are no matches at all, store a "0"

I know from theory that the percentage of no matches should converge to 1/e

This is what I have after a few hours of trial and error but it only generates a vector with a single element. I can't seem to retain the comparative iterations. In my code below, "w" is the vector that would store each shuffled comparison.

shuffle = function(m,n){
    deck=1:m
    repeat {        
    x=deck - sample(deck,size=length(deck))
    w=ifelse(length(x[x==0])>0, 1,0)
    if(length(w)==n)
    break
    }
return(w)
}

Any thoughts?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are overwriting w at each iteration so you only end up with the value of w at the final iteration.

If you know how many times you want to shuffle the deck it would be better to use a for loop than a repeat loop.

It isn't clear if you want w to contain the actual comparisons with deck or just the vector of 0s and 1s indicating if there was a match of not. ANyway, here are a couple of examples that implement both of those:

shuffle <- function(deck, n) {
    out <- logical(length = n)
    shuf <- deck
    for(i in seq_len(n)) {
        shuf <- sample(shuf)
        out[i] <- any(shuf == deck)
    }
    out <- as.numeric(out)
    out
}

Which is used as follows and produces:

> set.seed(42)
> deck <- 1:100
> (out <- shuffle(deck, 20))
 [1] 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1

A version that returns the positions of matches between deck and the shuffled deck is:

shuffle2 <- function(deck, n) {
    out <- matrix(NA, ncol = n, nrow = length(deck))
    shuf <- deck
    for(i in seq_len(n)) {
        shuf <- sample(shuf)
        out[,i] <- shuf == deck
    }
    out <- out + 0
    out
}

which is used as follows and produces

> set.seed(42)
> deck <- 1:100
> (out2 <- shuffle2(deck, 20))
       [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10] [,11]
  [1,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
  [2,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
  [3,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
  [4,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
  [5,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
  [6,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
  [7,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
  [8,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
  [9,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
 [10,]    0    0    0    1    0    0    0    0    0     0     0
....

That matrix of matches is easily processed to yield a vector of any matches or not:

> as.numeric(apply(out2 > 0, 2, any))
 [1] 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1

which matches that given by shuffle().

You could of course combine the two and have both returned by the function:

shuffle3 <- function(deck, n) {
    out <- matrix(NA, ncol = n, nrow = length(deck))
    shuf <- deck
    for(i in seq_len(n)) {
        shuf <- sample(shuf)
        out[,i] <- shuf == deck
    }
    out <- list(matches = out+0,
                summary = as.numeric(apply(out > 0, 2, any)))
    out
}

which is used as and procduces:

> set.seed(42)
> deck <- 1:100
> out3 <- shuffle3(deck, 20)
> str(out3)
List of 2
 $ matches: num [1:100, 1:20] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ summary: num [1:20] 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 ...
> out3$summary
 [1] 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1

Notice that, whichever version I use, I create an object to hold the results first of the required size, and then I fill in that object as I go along in the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this is really helpful. Yes, I was just after 1's = at least 1 match exists and 0's no matches exist at all on the output vector but I really appreciate the added approach that identifies position as well. –  Will Phillips Jun 15 '12 at 13:20

The part that you are missing is that inside the repeat, you should be computing a single value of your output for that iteration and assigning it to a specific position in an output vector (the position corresponding to the iteration).

Alternatively, the replicate function takes care of most of this for you:

shuffle <- function(m,n){
    deck <- 1:m
    replicate(n, {newdeck <- sample(deck)
                  anymatches <- as.numeric(any(deck==newdeck))
                  deck <- newdeck
                  anymatches})
}

and some examples:

> shuffle(5,35)
 [1] 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1
> shuffle(20,30)
 [1] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0
> shuffle(52,35)
 [1] 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice use of replicate() to manage storage space etc. –  Gavin Simpson Jun 15 '12 at 5:40
    
Thank you very much –  Will Phillips Jun 15 '12 at 13:11
    
2 quick questions 1. In your function you have deck <- newdeck. Am I correct in surmising that this resets the "deck" for each consective iteration to be the previously "shuffled" deck. I was originally thinking this: Original deck compared to shuffled deck #1 Original deck compared to shuffled deck #2 etc does deck <- newdeck in your function make it this: Original deck compared to shuffled deck #1 shuffled deck #1 compared to shuffled deck #2 etc 2. I removed deck <- newdeck and the function appears to run the same. Does removing it then generate what I was originally thinking? –  Will Phillips Jun 15 '12 at 16:55
    
You are correct. I was comparing original deck to shuffled deck #1, then shuffled deck #1 to shuffled deck #2, then shuffled deck #2 to shuffled deck #3, etc. Taking out the deck <- newdeck line compares each shuffled deck to the original one, and each shuffle is a single shuffle of the original deck. –  Brian Diggs Jun 15 '12 at 17:10
    
Cool. From a law of large numbers stand point the results are the same for both approaches, convergence toward 1/e. It's nice to show support multiple ways. Thanks again! –  Will Phillips Jun 15 '12 at 17:17

Edited: more efficient function

shuffle  <- function(m,n) {
  deck <- 1:m
  w <- numeric(n)
  for(i in 1:n){
    x <- sample(deck, m)
    w[i] <- 1*!(sum(deck==x)==0)
  }
  return(w)
}

and just like you said

1-sum(shuffle(20,1000))/1000
[1] 0.363
1/exp(1)
[1] 0.3678794

the old version:

shuffleSlow  <- function(m,n) {
  deck <- 1:m
  w <- numeric(0)
  repeat {        
    x <- sample(deck, length(deck))
    w <- c(w, 1*!(sum(deck==x)==0))
    if(length(w) == n)
      break
  }
  return(w)
}

and a useful comparison

> system.time(1-sum(shuffleSlow(30,100000))/100000)
   user  system elapsed 
  52.20    0.36   52.65 
> system.time(1-sum(shuffle(30,100000))/100000)
   user  system elapsed 
   2.95    0.00    2.94 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This works great. Quick question. At the beginning you have w <- numeric(0). What is this? Is this setting w as a zero length vector? –  Will Phillips Jun 14 '12 at 21:16
    
@GavinSimpson In reconsideration, upvote withdrawn. Originally gave it because it did solve the problem, albeit inefficiently and non-idiomatically. –  Brian Diggs Jun 14 '12 at 21:21
    
@Gavin Simpson, thank you for critique and advice, I was not aware of importance of this method though I use your way myself –  Julius Jun 14 '12 at 21:23
    
If you wish to update your answer I will happily remove the -1. –  Gavin Simpson Jun 14 '12 at 21:33
    
Updated, I am happy I could make it more useful now. –  Julius Jun 14 '12 at 22:02

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