Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

As I played a bit with the Scala REPL (Scala 2.9.1) I saw a surprising result with the isInstanceOf method:

scala> val l = List[Int](1, 2, 3)
l: List[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)

scala> l.isInstanceOf[List[Int]]
warning: there were 1 unchecked warnings; re-run with -unchecked for details
res3: Boolean = true

scala> l.isInstanceOf[List[String]]
warning: there were 1 unchecked warnings; re-run with -unchecked for details
res4: Boolean = true

scala> l.isInstanceOf[List[Boolean]]
warning: there were 1 unchecked warnings; re-run with -unchecked for details
res5: Boolean = true

Can anyone explain the last two results ?

share|improve this question
2  
Type erasure. See also stackoverflow.com/questions/339699/… – Geo Jun 14 '12 at 21:17
5  
"re-run with -unchecked for details". Did you do it? – Niklas B. Jun 14 '12 at 21:19
    
To blame myself: No, I did not. I could not figure out how to do that. If I use "compile -unchecked" at the sbt shell, it does not know this option. Where do I have to place this option ? – John Threepwood Jun 14 '12 at 21:28
1  
Just call the Scala REPL with that additional argument: scala -unchecked – Niklas B. Jun 14 '12 at 21:29
    
Thanks, that worked. Is there a way to start the Scala REPL out of sbt with the unchecked option, too ? Within the sbt shell, the command 'console -unchecked' will fail. – John Threepwood Jun 14 '12 at 22:06
up vote 11 down vote accepted

re-running with -unchecked:

scala> l.isInstanceOf[List[Int]]
<console>:9: warning: non variable type-argument Int in type List[Int] is 
unchecked since it is eliminated by erasure
              l.isInstanceOf[List[Int]]
                        ^

The specific type of the object is just not known at runtime. This is a general feature/limitation of the generics mechanism provided by the JVM. See Type erasure for more information.

share|improve this answer

It's due to type erasure which replaces the Int type parameter in List with the most generic type bound it can find. In this case, I believe that is scala.Any.

Note these will also yield true:

scala> l.isInstanceOf[List[scala.Nothing]]
warning: there were 1 unchecked warnings; re-run with -unchecked for details
res0: Boolean = true

scala> l.isInstanceOf[List[Any]]
warning: there were 1 unchecked warnings; re-run with -unchecked for details
res1: Boolean = true

scala> l.isInstanceOf[List[Object]]
warning: there were 1 unchecked warnings; re-run with -unchecked for details
res2: Boolean = true

Using javap to disassemble this simple class we can see that there is in fact no generic type in List[Int]:

class Bar{
  val list = List[Int](1,2,3)
}

The disassembled scala code:

public class Bar extends java.lang.Object implements scala.ScalaObject{
  public scala.collection.immutable.List list();
  public Bar();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.