Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm struggling to figure out how to profile a simple multiprocess python script

import multiprocessing
import cProfile
import time
def worker(num):
    time.sleep(3)
    print 'Worker:', num

if __name__ == '__main__':
    for i in range(5):
        p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(i,))
        cProfile.run('p.start()', 'prof%d.prof' %i)

I'm starting 5 processes and therefore cProfile generates 5 different files. Inside of each I want to see that my method 'worker' takes approximately 3 seconds to run but instead I'm seeing only what's going on inside the 'start'method.

I would greatly appreciate if somebody could explain this to me.

Working example:

import multiprocessing
import cProfile
import time
def test(num):
    time.sleep(3)
    print 'Worker:', num

def worker(num):
    cProfile.runctx('test(num)', globals(), locals(), 'prof%d.prof' %num)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    for i in range(5):
        p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(i,))
        p.start()
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're profiling the process startup, which is why you're only seeing what happens in p.start() as you say—and p.start() returns once the subprocess is kicked off. You need to profile inside the worker method, which will get called in the subprocesses.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow! I feel dumb :) this was so simple. Thank you very much! And thank you for the quick response. –  barmaley Jun 14 '12 at 21:58
    
You bet. And thank you for taking good care of your question! –  zigg Jun 14 '12 at 23:55
    
could you illustrate how to do that? –  Davoud Taghawi-Nejad Jul 23 '12 at 16:53
    
@DavoudTaghawi-Nejad See the "Working example" in the question. –  zigg Jul 23 '12 at 17:11
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.