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I have a class that has several member classes as attributes. The constructor of the class will take a filename of a byte file. The different member classes use subsequent parts of the file in their constructors, lets call them part A, B and C. The size of the file will vary.

Using the heap I would do something like this:

class myClass
{

    myClass(char *filename)
    {

        std::ifstream inputFile(filename, std::ios::binary);

        m_Class1 = new ClassA(inputFile); // read part A
        m_Class2 = new ClassB(inputFile); // read part B
        m_Class3 = new ClassC(inputFile); // read part C

        inputFile.close();
    }
}

I would like to do this on the stack instead of the heap.

Initialization lists come to mind, but for that I would have to waste time re-reading the redundant part of the inputfile to get to the part needed for each member class.

I don't know if this is just a terrible approach (most likely), but does anyone have any suggestions towards accomplishing this effectively? Or suggestions for another way of organizing this?

share|improve this question
    
"I would like to do this on the stack instead of the heap." Why? It's a particularly bad idea and likely a very premature optimization. –  Chris A. Jun 14 '12 at 21:53
    
I don't think there is any way to get around this since you must execute a statement in your constructor before initializing the fields, unless you move the stream parameter to a member function in Class[ABC]. I agree with @ChrisA.'s point; what is the purpose for placing the fields on the stack? –  Vortico Jun 14 '12 at 22:01
    
Allocating with automatic storage duration is a better way to define this instead of stack v heap. The stack is simply an implementation detail. Anyway, just use an initialization list in your constructor (assuming these types have default constructors). –  Ed S. Jun 14 '12 at 22:04
    
@ChrisA.: If you can use automatic storage duration, you should. It simplifies your program and prevents a certain category of errors. It is hardly a "premature optimization"; it is idiomatic C++. –  Ed S. Jun 14 '12 at 22:05
    
@EdS. Agreed about the automatic storage duration and am very aware of this idiom. My comment about the premature optimization was because the OP had "optimization" in his tags along with mention of moving this heap allocation to the stack. –  Chris A. Jun 14 '12 at 22:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
class myClass {
    myClass(char *filename) : inputFile(filename, std::ios::binary),
                              m_Class1(inputFile),
                              m_Class2(inputFile),
                              m_Class3(inputFile) {
        inputFile.close();
    }

private:
    std::ifstream inputFile;
    ClassA m_Class1;
    ClassA m_Class2;
    ClassA m_Class3;

};

Note that the declaration order of the members is important.

share|improve this answer
1  
You should note that the declaration order of the members is important. –  zdan Jun 14 '12 at 22:15
    
This makes class myClass non-copyable. If you want to copy/assign objects of type myClass, you might want to turn inputFile into a pointer (UgLY HAcK), deleting it when the initialization is done –  anatolyg Jun 14 '12 at 22:50

You can use the following, just slightly changed syntax. It's not "on the stack" but it doesn't use the heap, so might be good for you.

class myClass
{
public: // note: public constructor to make the class usable
    myClass(char *filename)
    {
        std::ifstream inputFile(filename, std::ios::binary);

        m_Class1 = ClassA(inputFile); // read part A
        m_Class2 = ClassB(inputFile); // read part B
        m_Class3 = ClassC(inputFile); // read part C

        inputFile.close(); // note: no need to close; C++ does this automatically
    }
private:
    ClassA m_Class1; // note: not a pointer
    ClassB m_Class2;
    ClassC m_Class3;
}

This requires ClassA, B and C to have default constructors and assignment operators (either default ones or those you have coded).

share|improve this answer
    
Note that ClassA, B, and C must have a default constructor for this to work. –  Vortico Jun 14 '12 at 22:03
    
This also required ClassA, B and C to have constructors without parameters, which is often not true. –  Pavel Strakhov Jun 14 '12 at 22:04

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