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Recently the PHP manual started showing the following warning on every mysql function page:

Use of this extension is discouraged. Instead, the MySQLi or PDO_MySQL extension should be used. See also MySQL: choosing an API guide and related FAQ for more information...

MySQLi used to be very buggy, but have they improved it so that it's finally worthy of its name? Is that why they're abandoning the MySQL extension and trying to get people to use MySQLi?

Actually, I would like to use MySQLi if it's not buggy anymore. It has more features and it's object oriented.

Any comments on this?

//EDIT: What I want to know is if it's OK to use MySQLi. Or is it still buggy? Should I go with PDO instead?

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4  
"MySQLi used to be very buggy" - what do you mean? – hakre Jun 14 '12 at 22:37
    
I've edited my answer to address your edit too. – Flavius Jun 14 '12 at 22:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes you can go with MySQLi and what you write is true, the API allows an easy change from the MySQL API.

For new projects it's recommended to not use ext/mysql any longer, but to use ext/mysqli or PDO_MySQL.

As you have not written what was buggy for you back in 2009, it's hard to say if these bugs are gone. I would assume so, but, well, check for yourself.

You might want to also use ext/mysqli with the MySQL native driver instead of the MySQL client server library (libmysql).

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thank you for your great answer. Any reasons to prefer MySQL native driver? – Ilyas Serter Jun 17 '12 at 19:08
1  
Take a look here: blog.ulf-wendel.de/?p=157 - It has better memory management for example, but that's just one reason. You can use it with either mysqli or PDO. – hakre Jun 17 '12 at 20:46

Yes. Since (very) long. We now have mysqli, or better yet, PDO.

I wouldn't lock myself into mysqli, I'd prefer PDO. Beside the easier migration it offers from one database system to another, it also offers better error handling.

What I want to know is if it's OK to use MySQLi. Or is it still buggy?

MySQLi itself is quite bug-free and it's used in production.

Should I go with PDO instead?

If your only argument for using mysqli is its similarity to mysql, then you'd probably not use mysqli to its full potential anyway. If you want to use mysqli to its full potential, then you'd have to start learning "anew" (it's not terribly much to learn, you know). If you start learning some new tool from "scratch", then why not learn the better alternative - PDO, in the first place?

On the other side, PDO is not perfect either. With PDO, you cannot access MySQL specific APIs (such as post-construct set_charset, infile settings, async queries, OUT params from prepared statements). Also, you should set it to do true prepared statements if you need them.

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I tried MySQLi in 2009, and it wasn't working properly. Since then, I have been using the default MySQL extension and it has been working without issues. Do you rather PDO over MySQLi for any particular reason? I'd rather MySQLi due to its similarity with MySQL. – Ilyas Serter Jun 14 '12 at 22:23
1  
I think I've mentioned in my answer why "PDO over MySQLi". MySQLi code tends to make the code more bloated than it needs be - from my experience because of the awkward error handling. If that's not a problem for you, go with MySQLi. But I strongly advise you to first test both out and see what's more elegant. – Flavius Jun 14 '12 at 22:26
    
If your only argument for using mysqli is its similarity to mysql, then you'd probably not use mysqli to its full potential anyway. If you want to use mysqli to its full potential, then you'd have to start learning anew. If you start from scratch, then why not learn the better alternative - PDO? – Flavius Jun 14 '12 at 22:33
2  
Well, there are problems with PDO. The fact that it doesn't do true prepared statements by default. The fact that it can't access MySQL specific APIs (such as post-construct set_charset, infile settings, async queries, OUT params from prepared statements, etc). It may be a nice API, but PDO isn't perfect either... I'm not saying to avoid it (but I do), just that it's not a clear, cut and dry why would anyone use mysqli as you're portraying it... – ircmaxell Jun 14 '12 at 23:50
    
@ircmaxell thanks, your comments have been integrated. – Flavius Jun 15 '12 at 18:33

The PHP MySQLi is an MySQL Improved Extension.

The mysqli extension allows you to access the functionality provided by MySQL 4.1 and above.

You can compare both of them at The MySQLi Extension Function Summary.


If you are searching for a future proof solution, object oriented, the way to go is PHP PDO.

The PHP Data Objects (PDO) extension defines a lightweight, consistent interface for accessing databases in PHP. Each database driver that implements the PDO interface can expose database-specific features as regular extension functions.

...

PDO provides a data-access abstraction layer, which means that, regardless of which database you're using, you use the same functions to issue queries and fetch data.

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It was about time. The mysql API, though easy to use, suffers from many problems. Arguably the worst problem is the complete lack of support for prepared statements, which forces you to piece together bits of SQL through string operations. This is not only slow but also a major source of SQL injection vulnerabilities.

One of the advantages of PDO over MySQLi is that you'll find that you don't have to learn a new API when you decide to use a different DBMS in a future project.

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