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I would like to know if the following code are valid.

The original intension is that, I like a base class that dispatch calls to a certain member to either derived class members if it is there or fall back to default behaviors if derived class does not have this member. Another use is that this base class can be used by itself and the Derived template parameter becomes a implementation policy. Anyway, the following MWE compiles and runs correctly with clang++, Intel, icpc and MSVS. However it fails with g++ (from 4.4 to 4.6, any version I had a hand on) with the error message at the end of the question.

If I change the call at point (1), (2), (3) to call_dispatch (which was the sort of thing I did originally), g++ does not complain anymore. I don't think it is a good practice to have the dispatch function and the caller having the same name. I was just curious if it will work, and curiously enough to try it out (I have no idea how does this idea come to me). My rationale behind this is that, at pint (1), call is invoked with one parameter, so the overload resolution will not match its caller, the zero parameter one. It will not match the SFINAE one at point (2) either, since D2 does not have the member, and then it shall match the one at point (3). Just as in the situation when (1)-(3) are named call_dispatch.

But g++ does not agree with me and other compilers. So, is it an incorrect implementation of g++ or the code itself is invalid? Besides the error message is really confusing. Where does the void (B<D2>::*)() and &B<D2>::call come from? Int he called the member pointer was defined as D2's member.

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

template <typename Derived>
class B
{
    public :

    void call ()
    {
        call<Derived>(0); //----------------------------------------- (1)
    }

    private :

    template <typename D, void (D::*)()> class SFINAE {};

    template <typename D>
    void call (SFINAE<D, &D::call> *) //---------------------------- (2)
    {
        static_cast<Derived *>(this)->call();
    }

    template <typename D>
    void call (...) //--------------------------------------------- (3)
    {
        std::cout << "Call B" << std::endl;
    }
};

class D1 : public B<D1>
{
    public :

    void call ()
    {
        std::cout << "Call D1" << std::endl;
    }
};

class D2 : public B<D2> {};

int main ()
{
    D1 d1;
    D2 d2;
    d1.call();
    d2.call();

    return 0;
}

Error:

foo.cpp: In member function ‘void B<Derived>::call() [with Derived = D2]’:
foo.cpp:48:13:   instantiated from here
foo.cpp:11:9: error: ‘&B<D2>::call’ is not a valid template argument for type ‘void (D2::*)()’ because it is of type ‘void (B<D2>::*)()’
foo.cpp:11:9: note: standard conversions are not allowed in this context

Edit

Though I have not fully understand what goes wrong in the above code yet. But I think there is a another way without specifically construct a SFINAE class but archive the same effect.

#include <iostream>

template <typename Derived>
class B
{
    public :

    void call ()
    {
        call_dispatch(&Derived::call);
    }

    template <typename C>
    void call_dispatch (void (C::*) ())
    {
        static_cast<Derived *>(this)->call();
    }

    void call_dispatch (void (B<Derived>::*) ())
    {
        std::cout << "Call B" << std::endl;
    }

    private :
};

class D1 : public B<D1>
{
    public :

    void call ()
    {
        std::cout << "Call D1" << std::endl;
    }
};

class D2 : public B<D2> {};

int main ()
{
    D1 d1;
    D2 d2;

    d1.call();
    d2.call();

    return 0;
}

Basically, because D1 and D2 both are derived from B, so the expression &Derived::call will always be resolved. In D1 it resolved to &D1::call, then the template version member is used. In D2, it does not have its own call, so &D2::call is resolved to &B::call, and thanks to
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas, who points out that now &D2::call has the type B::call, therefore the template and the non-template members equally match, but non-template is preferred. So the default call is used.

Can help me see if there is any defect in this new code?

share|improve this question
    
Not an answer but a work-around: Using a separate has_call traits class fixes the problem. –  pmr Jun 14 '12 at 23:03
    
Thanks for the hint. I know a few ways to fix. Still I want to understand what goes wrong here –  Yan Zhou Jun 14 '12 at 23:04
    
Exactly. Actually as mentioned all but gcc accept it without a warning. I usually develop with clang as it tends to be more strict than gcc and reject invalid code accepted by gcc. Now I am less sure of this –  Yan Zhou Jun 14 '12 at 23:09
    
Clang++ accepts the code, I am not 100% sure which of the two is correct... The problem is that because D2 inherits from B<D2>, so the expression &D::call is actually well formed, but strangely (I think this is a defect of the standard), the type is void (B<D2>::*)(), not void (D2::*)(), so it cannot be used in the template. Whether that is a Substition Failure or an error is a different issue. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 14 '12 at 23:13
    
Are you compiling in C++11 mode? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 14 '12 at 23:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Where does the void (B::*)() and &B::call come from?

The type of a pointer to member is not the type on which you obtained such pointer, but the type on which the member is defined.

struct base { int x; };
struct derived : base {};
int main() {
   std::cout << std::is_same< decltype(&derived::x), int (base::*) >::value << std::endl;
}

The above program prints 1. In your case, when you use &D::base, the compiler finds B<D2>::call as a member of the base template, and that is the result of the expression: void (B<D2>::*)().

share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense. Thanks for clear this part. –  Yan Zhou Jun 14 '12 at 23:35

Your instantiation of SFINAE is expecting the function pointer template argument to be of type void (D2::*)(), but instead is of type void (B<D2>::*)() (because call is not overidden in D2, it uses the one defined in B<D2>).

Edit

It is not the instantiation of template <typename D> void call (SFINAE<D, &D::call> *) that is failing here. There is no substitution error there. The substitution error occurs with the instantiation of SFINAE<B<D2>, &B<D2>::call>, of which there is no fallback instantiation, hence the error.

share|improve this answer
    
Since the types don't match, this is a Substitution Failure, is it not? So, according to the standard Is Not An Error and you have the whole SFINAE, which should discard that particular template and pick the next option, which is the one with the ellipsis. Should it not? Why not? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 14 '12 at 23:15
    
The quoted part only state what is a 'failure' as far as I understand. As @DavidRodríguez-dribeas said, it is not an error. If it is the only template member, then the program is illformed –  Yan Zhou Jun 14 '12 at 23:29
    
Withdrawn. I had to think about it a little more, but it seems there is a level of indirection with the substitution failure. –  anthony-arnold Jun 14 '12 at 23:41

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