Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Looking for a perl one-liner what will find all words with the next pattern:

X(not_X_chrs)X(not_X_chrs)X    e.g. cyclic

For one character, it is easy, e.g. for 'a'

perl -nle 'print if /^a[^a]+a[^a]+a$/' < /usr/share/dict/web2

but I want search for ANY character, so, looking for one regex for finding all words like:

azalea   #repeating a
baobab   #repeating b
cyclic   #c

and so on..

tried this:

perl -nle 'print if m/^([a-z])[^$1]+$1[^$1]+$1$/i' </usr/share/dict/web2

but not works.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted
(?:(?!STRING).)

is to

(?:STRING)

as

[^CHAR]

is to

CHAR

so you could use

/
   ^
   (\pL)
   (?:
      (?:(?!\1).)+
      \1
   ){2}
   \z
/sx
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is the best regex I could come up with:

^([a-z])((?:(?!\1).)+\1){2}$

Tested on RegexPal.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could also use a lazy quantifier with an atomic non-backtracking group:

^(\w)(?>\w*?\1){2}$

Altho that only works when 0 intermediate characters is acceptable.

With at least 1 character you'd have to use a negative lookahead:

^(\w)(?>(?!\1)\w+?\1){2}$
share|improve this answer
add comment

In perlretut it says that you can backreference in a regex (not the right part of a substitution) using \g1. This was changed in 5.14. Since I only have 5.12.2 here I have to use \1 instead.

Therefore, your original regex with a tiny adjustion worked for me:

use strict; use warnings;
use 5.12.2;
use feature qw(say);
for (qw/ azalea baobab cyclic deadend teeeeeestest doesnotwork /) {
  say if m/^([a-z])[^\1]+\1[^\1]+\1$/i;
}

Looking at it with YAPE::Regex::Explain

use YAPE::Regex::Explain;
print YAPE::Regex::Explain->new(qr/^([a-z])[^\1]+\1[^\1]+\1$/i)->explain();

yields:

The regular expression:

(?i-msx:^([a-z])[^\1]+\1[^\1]+\1$)

matches as follows:


use YAPE::Regex::Explain;
print YAPE::Regex::Explain->new(qr/^([a-z])[^\1]+\1[^\1]+\1$/i)->explain();

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?i-msx:                 group, but do not capture (case-insensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  ^                        the beginning of the string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \1:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    [a-z]                    any character of: 'a' to 'z'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  [^\1]+                   any character except: '\1' (1 or more
                           times (matching the most amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1                       what was matched by capture \1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  [^\1]+                   any character except: '\1' (1 or more
                           times (matching the most amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1                       what was matched by capture \1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  $                        before an optional \n, and the end of the
                           string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Edit: Your one-liner therefore is perl -e 'print if m/^([a-z])[^\1]+\1[^\1]+\1$/i'.

On another note, if you had tried perl -w -e 'print if m/(as)$1/' you'd have seen your problem immediately:

$ perl -w -e 'print if m/(a)$1/' asdf
Use of uninitialized value $1 in regexp compilation at -e line 1.
Use of uninitialized value $_ in pattern match (m//) at -e line 1.

What I have not figured out is why it matches ololololo.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.